More problems

More problems

Observation - More problems - UK and Ireland. Description: Time for more difficulty and perhaps create more problems than solutions The solution, with these v

Time for more difficulty and perhaps create more problems than solutions
The solution, with these very thin-membrane seaweeds, which we might call Lava or Nori is to ID them to Bangiales (an order of red algae in the class Bangiophyceae)
Why? Well because the colour, habitat, location, general morphology is not enough for a more precise ID. In any case the short expression Phenotypic plasticity applies to the Lavas
.
I know this to be Porphyra and probably P.purpurea but, from the general pictures it could be Pyropia, say Pyropia lucostrica
http://www.seaweed.ie/descriptions/Pyropia_leucosticta.php
I know it isn't that because most Pyropia grow on other seaweeds (as epiphytes); but we cannot tell from pictures without a decent text-scription.
.
You might solve the issue with microscopy - judge for your yourself with pictures 5 and 6 - most probably Pyrphyra purpurea - see https://www.algaebase.org/search/species/detail/?species_id=101 and
https://api.ispotnature.orghttps://api.ispotnature.org/storage/app/sites/default/files/frontend/21890/201909/P9090012%20a.JPG
. (stops help us pause for breath in iSpot)
.
So..did you get as far as pictures 7&8? or notice the spotting (not just the debris) in picture 4?
This shows a gorgeous epiphyte on the blades of the Lava.
This is almost certainly an Acrochaetium and possibly Acrochaetium secundatum (Lyngbye) Nägeli, 1858
But then we might best call it an Acrochaetioid algae and let Dave Fenwick sort it for us http://www.aphotomarine.com/red_seaweed_acrochaetioid_porphyra_25-08-18.html
See the problem?
Now see the encounter. https://www.ispotnature.org/communities/uk-and-ireland/view/observation/790716/chance-encounter
.
I loved my little discovery
.
EDIT added text