Liesbeek River (excluding Kirstenbosch)

Liesbeek River (excluding Kirstenbosch)

Liesbeek River (excluding Kirstenbosch) - Southern Africa : The Liesbeek (Lies = Reed & Beek = Stream), was named by Jan Van Riebeek. The river runs from Bishopscourt to Observatory and its confluence with the Salt River (at the Salt River Marshaling Yards) was was the site of the first recorded battle in 1510,

The Liesbeek (Lies = Reed & Beek = Stream), was named by Jan Van Riebeek. The river runs from Bishopscourt to Observatory and its confluence with the Salt River (at the Salt River Marshaling Yards) was was the site of the first recorded battle in 1510, between the forces of Francisco de Almeida and the Khoikhoi, where Almeida and 62 compatriots perrished. Van Riebeek farmed the banks of the river and his home, (now Bishops Court) had one of the most famous gardens outside England. The first free burghers settled on the banks of the River in Observatory in 1657, and the river was effectively parceled into farms. By the 19th Century the river was used extensively for laundry purposes by freed slaves. Industry followed and a tanning works, breweries and Mills were established. Josephine's Mill, (1818) and the Breweries (1820) continue operating to this day. The Observatory, built on a barren and rocky outcrop known as Snake Hill was completed in 1829.

Today the River is channeled in many parts, but is open at the source above Kirstenbosch and at the Observatory where the land has been proclaimed into the Two Rivers Urban Park (2003), which is included in the map.

The river is well known for bird life 120 species are known at the river (see More than just a corridor: A suburban river catchment enhances birdfunctional diversity Suri et al LUP 2016) , including a Snowy Egret which was observed in 2015. The critically endangered Moraea aristata is found on the Observatory Grounds.

This project aims to plot observations along the length of the river and is merely for pleasure.

30 Jun 2016
Andrewm