batch valley wildlife's picture

Common Jellyspot / Dacrymyces stillatus

Observed: 7th January 2015 By: batch valley wi...batch valley wildlife’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
DSCN0737
IS_228
IS_229
Description:
Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

marksteer's picture

Not sure why but photo

Not sure why but photo showing in 'carousel' but not in post???

The more I know the more I realise I don't know

batch valley wildlife's picture

Thanks for noticing. Not sure

Thanks for noticing. Not sure why, but have edited to out the photo back in.

marksteer's picture

Certainly looks like one of

Certainly looks like one of the Jelly fungi but not sure which. What is it on?

The more I know the more I realise I don't know

Fungorum's picture

I don't think that this is

I don't think that this is Phlebia radiata, the growth pattern doesn't look right. It looks more like Tremella to me. The jelly like appearance, the folded lobes and the individual bodies emerging on the left (and the colour) all fit with Tremella and there is no sign of the radial outgrowth of Phlebia radiata.

Fungorum's picture

Phlebia radiata has a radial

Phlebia radiata has a radial growth pattern with a thin advancing edge and a wrinkled surface behind like this.: http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0209+0006
To me the fungus above is typical of a Tremella - but I've already said that.

Here's a page with some Tremella photos showing the "folded lobe" growth pattern http://mushroomobserver.org/name/show_name/5422

flaxton's picture

I have to admit that this

I have to admit that this find does not have the usual Phlebia radiata growth form but it still does not look much like the "folded lobe" examples either.
A second visit is called for or a sample to put under the scope.
Mal

Fungorum's picture

By "folded lobes" I mean that

By "folded lobes" I mean that - the structure of the example above - if you zoom in - is like the structure in this image:- http://www.mykoweb.com/CAF/photos/Tremella_foliacea_bk-01.jpg albeit that here, it is a little more hydrated. Tremella does of course change in appearance depending on it's maturity and the amount of water present.

batch valley wildlife's picture

Thanks for the comments

Thanks for the comments all. Looks like there is not enough to make a specific ID, but I will go back and have another look at the sample over the weekend and post more pictures/info.

Mike

Fungorum's picture

Did you get back to it? It

Did you get back to it? It would be a shame to leave this with an incorrect ID of Phlebia radiata.

batch valley wildlife's picture

Nothing more instructive

I have gone back. I am not going to get photos which are more instructive. This seems the extent of the fungi.

Fungorum's picture

Thanks for looking again. It

Thanks for looking again. It would be helpful to know the consistency (jelly-like or firm). I've been thinking of other possibilities but haven't really found anything that fits. As I said I'm pretty sure it's not Phlebia radiata and if it isn't a Tremella I've run out of ideas. Hopefully someone will recognise it and let us know what it is.

Fungorum's picture

If you are still there

If you are still there Mal...

It does bear some resemblance to Craterocolla cerasi in "Fungi of Switzerland Vol.2" One that hasn't been recorded in the UK yet though.

batch valley wildlife's picture

Jelly like

Hi. I had a look at it again this morning. It has a jelly-like consistency, a bit like soft rubber (which I assume would rule out Phelbia radiata). I wonder if the original photo is a bit misleading. The fungi is very small, the main part is probably about an inch across. On the side of the stump there are just a small number of individual orange blobs as you can see around the fungi in the photo.

Fungorum's picture

I suppose that would fit with

I suppose that would fit with what little I've found on Craterocolla cerasi.

Here it is on Mycokey http://www.mycokey.com/MycoKeySolidState/species/Craterocolla_cerasi.html but the image in Fungi of Switzerland looks even more like your find.

marksteer's picture

Looks like this one might be

Looks like this one might be of interest to Kew Martyn Ainsworth if Fungorum is correct. Looking at photos on web he maybe right but I think this will need detailed investigation - microscope and possibly DNA.

The more I know the more I realise I don't know

Fungorum's picture

Ye, it is a long shot Mark.

Ye, it is a long shot Mark. It's obviously something I'm not familiar with.

flaxton's picture

Mike Don't suppose you fancy

Mike
Don't suppose you fancy sending a sample to me. It wouldn't guarantee an ID but it would hopefully take us a bit closer.
Mal

batch valley wildlife's picture

Very happy

Hi Mal

Very happy to send you a sample. It is probably something common being badly described by me, but it would be good to try to get to an identification. I will also get a identification for the tree it is on as I have not made a note of this.

My email is mpshurmer'at'gmail.com if you want to send me your address, with a bit of guidance on how to package it.

Mike

Fungorum's picture

If it is something new to the

If it is something new to the UK or rather rare it should still go to Kew for confirmation so as Mark says, I would contact Martyn Ainsworth and see if he would like a sample. If you can't find an email address then you can go through their main switchboard. http://www.kew.org/about/contact

flaxton's picture

Dave Thanks for the specimen

Dave
Thanks for the specimen it arrived safely but as I said it does not guarantee an id. It does however rule out one or two suggestions.
Dave it is not a Tremella or Craterocolla. Unfortunately it is not a Phlebia either. It is a perfect fit microscopically for Dacrymyces stillatus !!!!! The spores are three septate 13.5 - 16.5 x 5 - 5.5. The basidia is thin forked. If I had not seen the photo I would have no problem in giving this as the id but now I have no idea.
I will look further and will send Dave photos to post on this find.
Mal

marksteer's picture

Hi Mal Maybe my first

Hi Mal
Maybe my first thought/comment was not so far off the mark! A bit of a guess but certainly not like Dacrymyces (possibly stillatus) that I have seen.
Look forward to your further comments.
Mark

The more I know the more I realise I don't know

Fungorum's picture

I suppose that raises the

I suppose that raises the issue that there may be two different species here. The isolated peripheral bodies look that they could be Dacrymyces but are they the same fungus as the central mass? Was the specimen sent to Mal from that central mass?

flaxton's picture

Dave I was convinced I had

Dave
I was convinced I had picked up rogue spores on my first slide but I have since taken more samples from the middle of the brain like folds with exactly the same result. So there still might be two species but the septate spores and long basidia come from the middle of the convoluted specimen.
Mal
Ps Sorry Mike my last post should have been addressed it to you rather than Dave

Fungorum's picture

It's not something I have

It's not something I have seen before Mal but it does sound like some sort of brain-like Dacrymyces - and there appears to be two or three to choose from.

Edit: I see you have posted the ID now Mal. Not the most exciting result I suppose but interesting to know that it can look like that. Well done for sticking with it - and to Mike for finding and posting it.

batch valley wildlife's picture

New photos added

I have added the photos of the spores and basidia taken by Mal (flaxton), and amended the title to reflect the correct ID. The samples were taken from two different parts of the brain like folds and the separate bodies at the sides. Thanks to everyone for the comments and Mal for the ID. Apologies it did not turn out to be something more interesting.

marksteer's picture

No need for apologies! This

No need for apologies! This one looks very different to 'normal' D.stillatus and is a good example of the variability for fungi. Good that the experts have been able to pin it down

The more I know the more I realise I don't know