Prix Burgoyne's picture

Cytinus capensis flower info

Observed: 18th July 2011 By: Prix Burgoyne
Garden Route Botanical Garden
Plants expert
C capensis male
C capensis sectioned
Cytinus capensis perianth lobes
C capensis section captioned
Cytinus capensis  male
Cytinus capensis male captioned
Cytinus capensis female flower
C. capensis pollen
Description:

Parasitic plant producing deep red flowers in clusters that protrude above ground. Males and females produced on separate plants (dioecious). Not scented (at least not what humans can detect). Flowers comprise only 4 very dark maroon-coloured perianth lobes with inclined hairs covering most of their surface except for the margins. Confined to the Cape Peninsula (so far). This plant has only been available for study as a result of its discovery by amateur botanists.These piccies were taken after Jayne McDermid and Marland Holderness had found the plants and let me know about them.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Cytinus capensis interacts

Comments

outramps's picture

Cytinus

A wonderful series of pics. We are keeping our eyes peeled in the Southern Cape

Di

Prix Burgoyne's picture

Cytinus

Thanx there! You need to look out for a very smooth dark Cytinus from near Sedgefield. It is odd.

P

outramps's picture

dark Cytinus

A number of the Outramps live in Sedgefield and Brenton. Thye will certainly notice it if it comes up.

Di

marlandza's picture

Was checking to see if you had success

in your search for fruit.
Don't know how I missed these magnificent pics - thanks.

marland-uk
I can't let these lichens intimidate me!!
They are so tiny and yet so beautiful - so I must share, even if I can't name them.

Prix Burgoyne's picture

Fruit

We visited the original site (this site) where the first C. capensis was found and yes it appears there are fruits forming. There were only 5 clusters of plants (of the 5 clusters 2 were female) and with it being so scarce I did not dig any up to make sure but excavated a bit of the soil to one side and there are fat swollen flower bases present. So yes they are fruiting.

The second site (not yet on iSpot) proved to be more problematic. There were 7 clusters of plants but all of the flowers had aborted for some reason. They were perfectly formed unopened buds still and had just dried up as is. I took some of the unopened flowers to check the number of perianth lobes (to confirm/deny C. capensis) but have not yet had a look at them under a microscope with windowlene (that softens and rehydrates dried plant material).

Will keep you informed.

marlandza's picture

Thanks - great to hear about

Thanks - great to hear about the fruit, after all the disturbance at the original site. Was convinced they'd all been eaten.

marland-uk
I can't let these lichens intimidate me!!
They are so tiny and yet so beautiful - so I must share, even if I can't name them.

Tony Rebelo's picture

It must be eaten

But the fruit must be eaten: how else will it be dispersed?
The only question is: by whom?

marlandza's picture

No Man!!

Eaten months ago before they set fruit.

marland-uk
I can't let these lichens intimidate me!!
They are so tiny and yet so beautiful - so I must share, even if I can't name them.

Tony Rebelo's picture

Ahhhh!!: "predated"

Ahhhh!!: "predated" - eaten before the "ripe by date"

marlandza's picture

Exactly - by a predator?

Exactly - by a predator?

marland-uk
I can't let these lichens intimidate me!!
They are so tiny and yet so beautiful - so I must share, even if I can't name them.

Riaan Stals's picture

Seed predation

In entomological texts one often sees the awkward terminology "seed predation", frequently in the contexts of Bruchinae seed beetles and of insects diminishing the seed bank. But the predation meant there is (mostly) of fully developed, "ripe" seeds. Do I understand correctly from Tony's remark here that, at least in botanese, 'seed predation' refers to exactly something else, namely seeds being fed on before fully developed?

 
Beetledude

Tony Rebelo's picture

Correct

I am not aware of any specific terminology differentiating between "pre-release" and "post-release" fruit/seed predation.

I suspect that in crop circles herbivory applies to everything in the field and seed predation to pests of post-harvest storage.

But in most ecosystem studies it is more a case of pre-release and post-release seed predation, the former on the plant, the latter usually in/on the soil. There are a few cases of predation after ripening and before dispersal (e.g. Zulubius on A. caffra awaiting bird dispersal), but I am also not aware of any special terminology for this.

(fruit sensu a seed container, not the not-a-vegetable sense)

Wynand Uys's picture

How interesting to ponder...

"Seed predation". Hah!

Next time I meet a Vegan munching on sweetcorn or swilling lentil soup, I'll have a few things to say!

Riaan Stals's picture

Thanks

This is fantastic.

 
Beetledude