Rachy Ramone's picture

Pronounciation advice, please.

For example, Anemone x hybrida. (Japanese Anemone or Windflower)

How does everyone say it out loud?

Anemone cross hybrida?
Anemone ex hybrida?

Same question for everything with "var" in the middle - do you actually say "varr" out loud?

Do tell...

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Comments

martinjohnbishop's picture

Perhaps one should say

x as times (as in your times tables)
var as variety
Martin

lavateraguy's picture

Other alternatives ...

... are to pronounce "x" as "hybrid", or to treat it as silent.

Rachy Ramone's picture

"treat it as silent"

Now there's a good idea...

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

Ambroise's picture

I say "the hybrid so and so"

I say "the hybrid so and so" and otherwise omit the "x"

Rachy Ramone's picture

"Perhaps"?

Is this just a suggestion, or is this what you actually do? I'd like to know! Using "times" seems a bit clumsy - hell, they all seem a bit clumsy - and I think I'd probably use "by" rather than "times", if there really is no hard and fast rule for it.

Oh, and I know what var is short for, thanks, I am asking - oh, sorry, did you mean that for
Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae, you say out loud "Yew-forbia amig-dall-oy-dees variety robby-eye" or do you say "varr robby-eye" ?

*sigh* Such odd obstacles!

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

martinjohnbishop's picture

I do say times ...

... but only to myself as I have not met a botanist in the field for ages.
Any botanists out there like to take me on a field trip? See My profile if you would.

I would say variety because it is clearer and does not get confused with
an orchid rich part of southern France (where there are many vars,
and even specs mostly not accepted by the Kew Checklist).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Var_(department)
There was no implication that you are ignorant of the meaning of var.

I would also say aggregate and segregate because, heck, it does not
take much longer and it is less likely that I get hit by a paintball
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=agg
or a lump of Soft Elastic Gelatin
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SEG

Martin :-;

Rachy Ramone's picture

*snorts through nose*

Lovely answer, thank you!

Unfortunately I am in South Oxfordshire, which is a long way from Cambridgeshire, otherwise I would be delighted to drag you out on a field trip and force you to enjoy the intricacies of Tree Identification in Winter (my specialist subject, ha ha).

Or, even better, Conifer ID! My other specialist subject! Yay!

*coughs and regains serious demeanour*

Just out of interest, how do you deal with spp? I tend to mutter "species-plural" or sometimes "species-plus-plus" under my breath and hope that no-one notices.

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

martinjohnbishop's picture

Species is like sheep

One sheep, several sheep. Children being logical creatures sometimes say sheeps. Speciess won't work though. I think we are stuck with several species.
Regards,
Martin

Rachy Ramone's picture

Oh dear, I've been caught out!

Now that you mention it, I have heard myself say "species-ees" out loud before now, meaning "more than one species"!

Have made note to avoid doing it again.

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

Thistle's picture

... crossed with ...

... is how I've always thought of it.

Ian

David Shaw's picture

To the original question, I

To the original question, I would always say 'cross'. Saying x could be confused with 'ex' meaning a seed grown plant from a region or cultivar.
eg a plant grown from seed collected from Iris 'Blue Denim' would be called Iris ex. Blue Denim as it would have some genetic variation from the parent. A true Blue Denim would be taken from a division of the tubers.
Similarly, you could describe Primula veris ex. Norfolk. This might (I don't know) have just slightly different chacteristics to Primula veris ex. Dorset and be important if someone was wanting particular seed.

David

Rachy Ramone's picture

Thanks, David,

... all comments gratefully received!

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY