dejayM's picture

Cock's Comb Sea-weed

Observed: 17th October 2013 By: dejayM
Biological Recording In ScotlandHighland Biological Recording GroupOrkney Biodiversity Records Centre
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red mass
typical
structures
sporangia
cystocarp
combs
Description:

A very common red algae and, here, incredibly prolific in the strand-line. A whole range of reds from almost transparent grey-pink to very bright scarlet.
Viewed as originals, the top two photos can just be identified as Cock's Comb - P2 specially. But this is often as much as you get on a beach, without close inspection through a glass. BUT not all scarlet or red weed lookalikes are Cock's Comb.
Close-to Cock's Comb shows 'teeth' (comb) on one side only of the very final twigs; some, not all, samples I collected, showed continuous branching from one side only.
Some of the comb teeth appear to be sporangia in which are 6-8 tiny, regularly shaped and spaced, spore masses - seen in Picture 4.
There are much larger, at first spherical and complete cystocarps, which (appear to) burst and becomes cup-like - Pictures 3&5.
Picture 6 shows the key feature for ID - the Combs.
CORE EDITED to embrace P1&P2 and WoRMS link
WoRMS
EDIT (16/12/2014) - sorting out tags
See comment

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

dejayM's picture

Closer

This began as a post about a common seaweed.
Jo. Corke's related post here http://www.ispotnature.org/node/374537 which needs reading after this one, did little to settle me, because of the four apparently separable species mentioned.

A number of uncomfortable issues arose as I progressed - not least because I brought home some close lookalikes but, reading on -
"The general appearance of these [Plocamium cartilagineum] can greatly vary from very compact and closely branched to a much broader appearance with widely separated branching..." MaRLIN

"Recent studies have shown that there are actually four species of Plocamium in Northern Europe, P. cartilagineum, Plocamium subtile, Plocamium nanum and Plocamium maggsiae (Saunders & Lehmkuhl, 2005)." http://www.habitas.org.uk/marinelife/species.asp?item=ZM6310
A link to the whole paper is found here (pdf)
http://www.algaebase.org/search/species/detail/?species_id=72959
A key to the useful ID boundaries between these four species is not available so, for those of us who browse the shore, this is the Cock's Comb seaweed. Isn't it?

A very comforting synopsis of this and many other seaweeds is in The Searsearch Guide (Seaweeds) http://www.summerfieldbooks.com/showdetails.asp?id=2953
EXCELLENT value.

JoC's picture

Plocamium cartilagineum

I am agreeing P. cartilagineum for photos middle right and bottom left; and probably for both top images. I am thinking about the id of images 3 and 6....
Jo

Jo

dejayM's picture

helping

Yes, you'd be right to be reserved about both those. Bottom right (no.6) was possibly Ptilota gunneri http://seaweeds.uib.no/?art=839 . Picture 3 may have been the same but I have replaced them (already) as they were mistakes - although I wanted to show the lookalike.
Pictures 1 & 2 are taken at a different time and different place. Even looking at originals, they are not clear enough to be absolutely certain. So, I might replace those too.
Picture 6 now shows the key to ID - tiny combs. The French have a nice description - Peigne des Néréides. The NEREIDES were Greek Nymphs of the sea, patrons of sailors and fishermen, who came to the aid of men in distress. These goddesses had in their care the sea's rich bounty.

I have been avoiding algae for too long..
Thanks again Jo. - you're helping a lot.
ð

JoC's picture

other red seaweeds

I think you are right to keep each post for a different species; however, you might like to post the 'others' separately and someone may offer an id.
Jo

Jo

dejayM's picture

safe

So Jo., you may now safely assume that all these pictures are of Cock's Comb, if not Plocamium cartilagineum!

JoC's picture

Peigne des Néréides.

..... it is. Photos 3, 4 and 5 which show the reproductive organs are especially valuable as there are not many of these posted on the web.

Jo

Jo

dejayM's picture

Welcome

Welcome to Lucy (lulu0705) I DO hope you'll stay in the Marines!
ðj

dejayM's picture

GBIF

Origin 11 Feb
Jo
I have discovered a MUCH better DataPortal than NBN (is it safe to say that here?)
It takes a little bit of handling but becomes simple after a few tries.
Perhaps you can give me an opinion.
>>TEST<<
ðj
EDIT
Jo the New GBIF portal is here http://www.gbif.org/species but it appears that one has to be logged in to take advantage. I have done that. It does seem to be using quite dated Data. Can you check it out. Yes, the News Items are quite absorbing.
ð

JoC's picture

GBIF

GBIF Portal. Still exploring... there is more information on some species than others. For example, a search for Chondrus crispus gives, (below the section called 'Subordinate Taxa'), a 'table of contents' with Abstract, Description etc. There is nothing similar for P. cartilagineum.
I have registered too, though I have not noticed any problems in accessing the data so far. I will see if I notice any difference once the regn. is confirmed.
Jo

Jo

JoC's picture

Dj, I have just started

Dj, I have just started exploring the GBIF & it is good. I looked at P. cartilagineum (why not) and their database was impressive.
The news items are another interesting feature; I got sidetracked by the Squirrel niche item, which suggests to me there are a lot of models out there that may be in need of reworking. So much to do, so little time...
Will continue to explore.
'Welcome to Lucy, from me too.
Jo

Jo

dejayM's picture

Chile too

What I specially like is that it is Global. The rectangle can me moved to cover the records and each can be investigated down the date and named Recorder; that's very hard to do, even when registered, with NBN.
I am going to persevere and will put more links in my Spots as time progresses.
P. cartilagineum in Chile, whatever next!
ðj

JoC's picture

How do I make this a 'favourite'

So I can come back to it again?
Jo

Jo

dejayM's picture

Add to favourites..

Open the Post, look for the green Star and click. Then go to your My Profile and see your faves listed near the bottom.
ð

JoC's picture

Thanks dj.

Just like it says on the tin! I can't believe I had not seen this green star before!
Jo

Jo

dejayM's picture

Stars and strikes

Coming back to posts and comments is fraught (for me) - seeing glaring errors of judgement, information, grammar and sprelling does nothing for confidence. If it wasn't for people clicking reply, instead of making a New comment, I would spend half my iSpot time, correcting and rewording! (thank goodness for Reply then!)
Hidden in the comments above is a BROKEN link to the Old GBIF Portal, which is no longer viable. I have moved on a lot in the intervening time but still favour GBIF over NBN (but if only either of them was up to date, I'd be happier).
Anyway, anyone coming here should see how it works by clicking on this http://www.gbif.org/species/5278595, zooming into the area of interest and clicking In Viewable Area (right). One can then interrogate individual records (without registering). Also the link, in the right of the Panel, to Biodiversity Heritage Library opens the book to early history of the organism in question.