miked's picture

Miked - - 1st November 2008

Observed: 5th June 2005 By: miked
iSpot team
miked’s reputation in Invertebratesmiked’s reputation in Invertebratesmiked’s reputation in Invertebratesmiked’s reputation in Invertebrates
MG 9493
Description:

on nettle leaf

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Martin Harvey's picture

???

I've got no idea what type of invertebrate that might be!

Martin Harvey
Biodiversity Observatory

----
Entomologist and biological recorder

Jonathan's picture

Have a look at the book

Have a look at the book about insects on nettles by BNK Davis

Jonathan Silvertown

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

miked's picture

do you have a copy that you

do you have a copy that you could bring in to look at? might be an idea if we had a bunch of ID books in the bio obs lab for general reference as I suspect we shall start to get all sorts of queries. there are a few new general ones but with loads of species in which i am sure general public will be getting so could be a good place to point them.

Jonathan's picture

I agree about the need for ID books

I have quite a few ID books in my office and this room will shortly be available to the team for small meetings, so it could also become the iSpot library (subject to usual rules about borrowing!).
Jonathan Silvertown

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

Martin Harvey's picture

Insects on nettles

I have this book, and having looked through it again am still none the wiser as to what group your species might be in (i.e. the round hairy species rather than the young aphid that is also in the photo). Do you have any other photos from different angles?

Martin Harvey
Biodiversity Observatory

----
Entomologist and biological recorder

miked's picture

Unfortunately I don't have

Unfortunately I don't have any other shots of it, I was photographing the stinging hairs on the nettle leaf - handheld which is quite tricky given how tiny they are. Then just noticed this wee beastie coming into view, as you can appreciate it is quite small too, about the size of an immature aphid so you may have difficulty seeing it with the naked eye which is why they may have left it out of most ID books.
could go on safari next summer to see if we can find another one since it was only a few hundred metres from the office.

Kluut's picture

Scale insect - coccoidea

As to species????????

Dioctria's picture

Bug Nymph?

I wonder if it might be an early instar bug nymph. You can make out the eyes and antennae and it appears to have small wing buds.

David

Kluut's picture

Shield bug nymph?

There is a good photographic website for native shield bugs here - http://www.ukwildlife.bravehost.com/article/shieldbugs/shieldbugs.html

but I can't find a good likeness

miked's picture

I see what you mean about the

I see what you mean about the shield bug nymphs shown on that website but the one in this observation is really very small, possibly even smaller than those shieldbug nymphs. Also I don't know if there are other types of insect with similar nymphs.

Kluut's picture

Size?

A hatchling shield bug will be much the same size as a shield bug egg. I would reckon that that would be pretty small.

rimo's picture

Having bred shield bugs, I

Having bred shield bugs, I don't think even hatchlings are quite as small as this appears to be - they inflate a surprising amount on hatching, and the wing buds are smaller than these. What about a froghopper nymph of some sort?

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Donal's picture

A psyllid nymph

I am fairly certain this is a psyllid nymph. The subcircular, flattened shape is typical.

It is difficult to be certain which species it is but Trioza urticae is common and as far as I know it is specific to nettles. See BNK Davis Insects on Nettles p.50-51 and White and Hodkinson RES handbook to Psyllid nymphs p.40-41

Kluut's picture

General key

http://www.psyllids.org/psyllidsMorphology.htm

The nymph of Trioza urticae would normaly be inside a gall. Is this one small enough to be a newly-hatched one?

Joe Botting's picture

Trioza nymphs

...live inside pit galls, which are just shallow depressions rather than being enclosed. This is certainly Trioza urticae - very distinctive, once you've seen a few.