JoC's picture

Epiphytes or parsites maybe

Observed: 20th September 2013 By: JoCJoC is knowledgeable about PlantsJoC’s earned reputation in PlantsJoC’s earned reputation in Plants
epiphytes 1
Description:

On extracting this seaweed from a bottle a week after collecting I noticed that there were many very small filamentous structures attached to it. Under a higher power these proved to be a variety of organisms, perhaps epiphytes, parasites or just hitch-hikers. They may be be algae or fungi....

Identifications
  •  
    Likely ID
    Epiphytes or parasites maybe
    Confidence: It's likely to be this, but I can't be certain.
  • aufwichs
    Confidence: I'm as sure as I can be.
  • aufwuchs
    Confidence: I'm as sure as I can be.
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

markwilson's picture

id

How about stalked diatoms - try a google on this

dejayM's picture

detritus

Agreements won't come thick and fast - and I haven't yet as I think the post may develop. I have some like it but I had taken it all to be, well, shoreline detritus.
Mark's idea is interesting but you'll need better pictures and closer study. Off you go..
ð

JoC's picture

Stalked diatoms

Thanks Mark - I recognised the diatom structure/shape of some of the ‘attachments’ under the m’scope but had assumed they were just free-living ones that had become caught on some threads….. do you want to suggest an ID of Stalked diatoms? If so, I would agree it.
Now I have googled ‘Stalked diatoms’ I see there is more to this than meets the eye. However, in the preface to H & R they say: “The plankton and the meiofauna*, although interesting and abundant, and certainly deserving of attention, are too numerous and divers for even a representative selection to be included here.” As I said, Life is too short ….
*I looked this word up – “Meiofauna or meiobenthos are small benthic invertebrates that live in both marine and fresh water environments. The term meiofauna loosely defines a group of organisms by their size, larger than microfauna but smaller than macrofauna, rather than a taxonomic grouping. In practice these are organisms that can pass through a 1 mm mesh but will be retained by a 45 μm mesh, but the exact dimensions will vary from researcher to researcher. Whether an organism will pass through a 1 mm mesh will also depend upon whether it is alive or dead at the time of sorting.”
Jo

Jo

markwilson's picture

aufwuchs

Not confident enough for id as it was based on long ago lectures- there is a spledid German word for epiphytic organisms "aufwuchs"

JoC's picture

Aufwuchs it is then

From the internet: Aufwuchs (German "surface growth" or "overgrowth") is the collection of small animals and plants that adhere to open surfaces in aquatic environments, such as parts of rooted plants. In both marine and freshwater environments, algae – particularly green algae and diatoms – make up the dominant component of aufwuchs communities. Small crustaceans, rotifers, and protozoans are also commonly found in fresh water and the sea, but insect larvae, oligochaetes and tardigrades are peculiar to freshwater aufwuchs faunas. (Wikipedia)
Aufwuchs, procedurally defined as material accumulating on submerged surfaces, is being used increasingly to monitor trace element bioaccumulation in aquatic biota. (Newman & McIntosh 1989)

Jo

dejayM's picture

we few

dejayM's picture

Appropriateness

Original comment 3 Oct
Well Jo..I think there's an issue here.
Aufwuchs is also "...defined as material accumulating on submerged surfaces.." and "..may not accurately reflect accumulation by biota.."
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0269749189902224
Or
"...used to describe the aggregate of plants, animals and detritus adhering to solid surfaces such as rocks or vegetation in aquatic environments" http://www.seriouslyfish.com/glossary/a/aufwuchs/

My suggestion, rather tongue-in-cheek, of detritus, is not, then, so misplaced but it is not within YOUR meaning.
You may have prompted some discussion but I'd prefer to agree with epiphytes or parasites on the grounds that they all look the same (more or less) - so is it a loose colony and not then ASSORTED biota.
There is a lovely link-back to our favourite, almost original subject here - if you can be bothered. http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/1937199?uid=3738032&uid=2129&uid=2...
I do think we owe Mark a vote of thanks!
I think it would be easy to repeat 'the experiment' and you should. The whole iSpot community is holding its breath!
...........
I came back end of November and considered this had been too long in the doldrums!
So now you have a likley ID!

JoC's picture

Aufwuchs

We do owe Mark a vote of thanks for bringing to the surface this lovely, interesting word. We must find more ways to incorporate it into other posts - e.g. a beautiful seaweed and its aufwuchs. I just google-translated the word - 'Growing up' (or 'tyfu i fyny')!

Jo

dejayM's picture

Перифітон

You certain it's not growing on as in Periphyton?
Either way it's a cool word and yes we must find some more ways to use it (I've done it twice - it's now a searchable word!)
d
.......
Oh, Jo. and note I have begun the process of adding a WoRMS link to my posts. I may trawl back and do it with all my Marine Inverts.
see http://www.ispotnature.org/node/278065
d

JoC's picture

Growing on

makes more sense.
I have started a WoRMS trail too.
Jo

Jo

dejayM's picture

Project

Origin 10th
>>Marines Project<<
...........
The gallery here http://www.ispotnature.org/taxonomy/term/25527
Notice that the counter shows number of times read. This one is amazing at 230, so far!
ð
Later
Note the very recent comment by Nick here http://www.ispotnature.org/node/337828#comment-173379