dejayM's picture

Marine Flatworm

Observed: 27th August 2013 By: dejayM
Biological Recording In ScotlandHighland Biological Recording GroupOrkney Biodiversity Records Centre
dejayM’s reputation in InvertebratesdejayM’s reputation in InvertebratesdejayM’s reputation in InvertebratesdejayM’s reputation in Invertebrates
whole
size
under
eyes
wrinkled
flat
Description:

Certainly a flatworm and certainly with two eyes and a ridge along its back.
http://www.polarlife.ca/organisms/inverts/marine_inverts/turbellarians.htm
and
http://species-identification.org/species.php?species_group=marine_plana...
Whilst 'Arctic' it is said to occur in European waters (Species-identification.org) but NBN doesn't recognise the name nor, I should add, does it appear in the hitherto definitive handbook by Hayward and Ryland.
On the face of it the specimen here is larger than it ought to be, at 30mm, but most other features seem to match.
Picture 6 shows how flat it was but also how it moved in the hand.
Another marine flat worm appears at http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/126704
Leptoplana tremellaris may fit all the criteria but it does not occur (NBN) north of Douglas (IOM)
...
Core edit
corrected two words

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

JoC's picture

Marine flatworm

What an interesting find, dj. It is going to give me some fun seeing if I think you are right! I may have to resort to looking it up in the hardback Hayward & Ryland which is the complete work in two volumes. That will require a trip to the library, though.
Jo

Jo

dejayM's picture

the worms!

Yep, another (possibly Pseudomystides limbata) here http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/364889.
And another one..
http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/364918

JoC's picture

Marine flatworm.

Hayward and Ryland 2 volumes hardback is in front of me – but no Foviella affinis. Your link to Artic areas looks not unlike it.

Further searching….

1. This 1931 paper mentions F. affinis (listed at No. 38), in Greenland, the Faroes, North Sea (Bergen) Skagerak, The Sound (kaslle-bodstrand). This sounds a bit far from you…..any near enough to you to be possible?
http://macrostomorpha.info/sites/macrostomorpha.info/files/Steinb%C3%B6c...

2. Journal of Natural History. Volume 39, Issue 6, 2005. Biodiversity of marine planarians revisited (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Maricola). “Foviella affinis(Oersted, 1843) Synonymy: Procerodes solowetzkianusSabussow.1900.” Paper is of limited availablility on internet.

3. See a couple of flatworms like yours half way down this British Columbian site. No id though…
http://wanderinweeta.blogspot.co.uk/2010_06_01_archive.html

4. following the Procerodes idea…
How about Procerodes littoralis? It’s in British waters.
Or – Aphotomarine has Leptoplana tremellaris? (– his question mark) for a similar looking animal.
http://www.aphotomarine.com/flatworm_possibly_leptoplana_tremellaris.html

Jo

dejayM's picture

Coming back

Yes Jo., for some reason I did not come back to you over this - forgive me.
Graham, below, has prompted me to return and I will, probably, post it as Leptoplana tremellaris - not in the hope of getting agreements, necessarily, but to try and expand the subject a little. It's all my own fault for looking too closely at things I know nothing about - perhaps I should stick to things like Chaffinches and Mackerel!
ðj

gramandy's picture

doesn't look....

...dissimilar to the one I reported

http://www.ispotnature.org/node/340980

although as you know Derek - I need more clarity - so eyes etc difficult to make out - mine are also much smaller but in abundance. These were also quick moving. I prefer turbellarian to worm - don't really know why.

dejayM's picture

Leptoplana tremellaris

Yes I agree and it may well be the same (Leptoplana tremellaris) as Jo. has mentioned above.
Your pictures are fine - you know that they are not quite perfect but hey, they are good enough.
I'll come back to this and your later today.
I need to read -
http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Turbellaria/
and
http://www.marlin.ac.uk/taxonomydescriptions.php#turbellaria
I am, along with quite a few others have LOT'S of trouble posting properly.
See http://www.ispotnature.org/node/391667
and
http://www.ispotnature.org/node/391667
ðj

gramandy's picture

NBN and...

...all that - what are we to do? - the posting probs are not really new but iSpot will I guess get to sort these probs out eventually (maybe). Don't really understand why you can post and then post again and get different downloads (recorded /not recorded), been doing this for a while.

Maybe some of the marine (or as I always put..coastal) postings are too far removed for most people to comment or agree.

Well I need to get to grips with this camera of mine and give you some decent dropbox pics for you to descry. I am nearly back on the scene but still for the next 3 weeks will not be in a position to present lots of my pics/seafront data/etc. WIll try to inundate eventually.

Don't forget sticking to things though - we could be talking Horse or otherwise. Fringilla well !! are we going coelebs (Sting, Madonna, etc) or palmae (Roger of course) or maderensis (just like me) or of course teydea (2 lumps of sugar in mine please).

Much better stuff to come when I have time - forgive me.

To the question in hand - tremellaris maybe? Big though?

dejayM's picture

Returning

Responding to JScott (Joyce) here http://www.ispotnature.org/node/453665 has brought me back, hence a new ID.
We were getting to Leptoplana tremellaris in the comments
I am helped a bit more by Andy Cowley's Website pics http://www.joc123.webspace.virginmedia.com/Leptoplana-tremellaris.html

JoC's picture

Leptoplana tremellaris

Previous comments, and the description in
http://species-identification.org/species.php?species_group=macrobenthos...
have encouraged me to agree.

Jo

dejayM's picture

questing

yes Jo, thanks.
It's all a bit of a workaround isn't it.
We cannot be certain - who could be? I'm as certain as I can be and you have agreed,
I think it a pity that Andy Cowley did not put some text to his pictures. But I gess he also used the MSIP site for confirmation. Even so, his pictures are far better than many.
If it's text we want, then here is Othone (Otto) Frederico MÜLLER'S >>1773 Latin Description<< - a rare thing to find but oh for some good illustrative artwork!
And there's an unusual picture in the BOLD (Barcode of Life Data) site that is reassuring because it matches my P3.
But you have to admit - definitive descriptive information or illustrations are very scarce, though this French version via DORIS http://doris.ffessm.fr/fiche2.asp?fiche_numero=1089 looks good (my French is not good enough though Jo).
These worms are difficult by my standards but the quest, even without the goal, is interesting.

JoC's picture

Quel site Web

No doubt about it - un ver plat sans taches, sans tentacles - il reste juste L. tremellaris.
I like this bit: Très mobile, rapide, "excité" lorsqu'il est dérangé. A deranged flatworm - take care.

Jo