nlo123's picture

Nature Survey

Hello

My daughter has been looking for all sorts of insects, butterflies, etc and writing up about them on her nature blog.

So far she has found things such as:

common toad, common frog, CINNABAR MOTH CATERPILLAR, GATEKEEPER BUTTERFLY, Hairy Shieldbug, COMMON BLUE BUTTERFLY, PLANT BUG, Grasshopper, Japygidae - Diplura, Newt, Lace Webbed Spiders, various butterflies etc

I don't think she has had any visitors to her blog, there are some really interesting photos...

Maybe you would like to have a look?

http://tweetbirdnews.blogspot.co.uk/

There are some insects which we are not sure what they are, we could do with some help identifying them.

All the best Nicola

Reply

Comments

Amadan's picture

Good site indeed

Why not post the unknowns here in the Observations section? You should find at least some can be identified.

DavidHowdon's picture

Add some of them to iSpot

as suggested and you may well get them IDd. Looking at the link a couple of suggestions.

The fungi labelled "I found growing in the woods in my garden on a fallen branch" looks like Auricularia auricula-judae

The cocoon shown in the entry "At Talacre Beach" is one of the Burnet moths (Zygaena spp.) but it will not be possible to get to a species level.

Wildlife Ranger's picture

Great Blog !!!

Hey what a terrific blog for such a small person ;-) Keep up the good work . Have fun in the jungle Great work on the Shieldbug

Your bug and buttefly is on Sea Holly I believe

I think Noo Noo is a Palmate Noot

Fun Things

Get a small tray cardboard box thingy and a brush shaft with a hook on the end Shake the branches and beat the bramble , making sure no wasps or birds nest around . See what falls into your box !!

Find a froghopper

Shake a Shieldbug

Eye up a Ladybird

Have fun

Oh !!! I think Mr Martin ;-) from the OU should also immediately send a " Well Done Certificate" from the OU with a special mention on works with Frogs & Toads

WLR

Whats Happening with Nature ??? Visit the Nature Blog

http://florafaunauk.blogspot.co.uk/

www.ukwildlife.net

Supporting FEET Conservation work & Biodiversity Recording

http://www.ebid.net/uk/stores/medic1/Natural-History

nlo123's picture

Alexandra's Blog

Hello
Alexandra was so happy to know that you had read her blog and she loved finding out that Noo Noo newt is a palmate newt, she was able to search for lots of photos on google... she has also updated her blog with the new information and is keen to beat a bush and see what falls out, so watch this space! Thanks for writing.

Wildlife Ranger's picture

Alexandras Brill Blog Please Take a Look

Alexandra appears to be a little star :-) ( with a very Helpful Mummy ) Hope she continues to post all her treasures and everyone on i-spot will look out for her very excellent work and hope some day to see her on Spring Watch presenting the programme ;-) In the meantime back to school (unlucky :0 )

http://tweetbirdnews.blogspot.co.uk/

WLR

http://tweetbirdnews.blogspot.co.uk/

http://tweetbirdnews.blogspot.co.uk/

Whats Happening with Nature ??? Visit the Nature Blog

http://florafaunauk.blogspot.co.uk/

www.ukwildlife.net

Supporting FEET Conservation work & Biodiversity Recording

http://www.ebid.net/uk/stores/medic1/Natural-History

nlo123's picture

Alexandra's Blog

Hello
Thank you for letting Alexandra know the name of the fungi and what the cocoon is. She was very excited to read your comment and has updated her blog with the new names.

nlo123's picture

a

a

John Pilkington's picture

Tremendous Site

The yellow flower, about half way through near the bug labelled "what is this" looks like an Evening Primrose, not sure whether Common or Large.

John

nlo123's picture

Alexandra's Blog

Thank you for taking an interest in Alexandra's blog and for letting her know that the yellow flower was an evening primrose, she has updated her blog

scarpermac's picture

Wow, what a blog

Absolutely puts me to shame.
Really great to look at and read.
Fantastic work!

Feel free to look at my ongoing (hopefully improving) collection of pictures on Flickr:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/46256910@N00/

nlo123's picture

Alexandra's Blog

Thank you for your kind comments, Alexandra was very pleased to read them, she absolutely loved looking at your photos, they really are stunning.

scarpermac's picture

Photos

Very kind to say so!

Feel free to look at my ongoing (hopefully improving) collection of pictures on Flickr:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/46256910@N00/

lutz's picture

Nice blog Alexandra!

Greetings from Denmark :) ( now you can learn some geography too ;) )
I find the blog very refreshing, to see young people be excited about the gift of Nature
Just wanted to say that the what is this?! -bug is a cicada. Almost all cicadas looks like this in Denmark. We even got one type of cicada from USA - rododendron cicada. I think that is a beautiful one.

Keep up the joy of Nature

Jonas :)

Joe Botting's picture

Froghopper

It's the Common Froghopper, Philaenus spumarius - a lovely animal. In English, 'cicada' is used only for the Cicadidae - the very large, noisy things you find in warmer countries (we have one very rare species in the UK, living in the New Forest).

Fabulous blog, Alexandra. :o)

Martin Harvey's picture

Nature Blog

Just wanted to add my congratulations, some good stories on the blog, glad you found a Red Underwing at your wine cloths, that's one of my favourite moths!

The black spider with dents (first photo in the 9th and 11th October posts) is called Nuctenea umbratica (sometimes also known as the Walnut Orb-weaver Spider) - there's some more of them here on iSpot:
http://www.ispotnature.org/species_dictionary/Nuctenea%20umbratica

Do you know about Project Wild Thing?:
https://projectwildthing.com/

If you look at their "wildtime" section there's some more ideas for outdoor projects. They'd be interested to hear about your blog as well I expect.

----
Entomologist and biological recorder

nlo123's picture

Thanks

Hi Martin

Many thanks for your kind comments and for identifying the uctenea umbratica - Walnut Orb-weaver Spider for us, Alexandra has been able to update her blog and also learn more about that particular spider.

I haven't heard about project wild thing, do you have to 'join' to access the information? I didn't see the 'wild time' section.

I am always looking for new outdoor ideas / things to do with Alexandra (and my youngest Francesca) as I am keen for her to grow up loving and being interested in the outdoors....in doing so, hopefully I can steer her away from the trappings of modern technology as much as possible.... so any ideas are most welcome!!

Thanks to everyone helping Alexandra to ID her ' findings' on her blog. It really is appreciated.

Furthermore, can anyone recommend some good books on insects / spiders / fungi etc, we have a couple of books but more often than not, the things Alexandra finds aren't detailed in them.

All the best

Nicola

DavidHowdon's picture

Books

you quickly get into very expensive territory if you want books that contain everything you might find.

For general insects "Insects of Britain and Western Europe" and "Insects of Britain and Northern Europe" from Michael Chinery are a good starting point.

Michael J Roberts "Spiders of Britain and Northern Europe" is probably the most complete 'popular' title. His 1980s series "The Spiders and Great Britain and Ireland" from Harley Books is well thought of and out of print so hard to get (a set for £140 serious tempted me at the AES exhibition this year)

Fungi is even less my area but Roger Phillips "Mushrooms" is well thought of. It is also available in (free) website and (free?) iPhone app form.

Martin Harvey's picture

wild time

I don't think you have to join or register (although you can if you wish). The "wild time" section should be accessible here:
https://projectwildthing.com/wildtime

and to join I think you have to go here:
https://projectwildthing.com/take-action

and then scroll down to click on the link that says "join the movement".

----
Entomologist and biological recorder

Thistle's picture

Congratulations

Congratulations - to both mother and daughter - on an excellent blog.

Thinking of books, have you come across the Field Studies Council fold-out charts? Have a look at http://www.field-studies-council.org/publications/fold-out-charts.aspx.

Keep up the good work.

Ian

John Pilkington's picture

Project Wildthing

Hi Martin,

Thanks for publishing the link to Project Wildthing; a very interesting project. My daughter is the Project Officer for "Gwyl Taf", being run by the South East Wales Rivers Trust, and part of her remit is to get children more involved in enjoying the River Taff. She has already run sessions to introduce primary school children to river creatures, and she has taken river samples to a number of local shows to enthral youngsters. She has also run Learn2Fish and Learn2Kayak sessions and is now making contact with the project and Play Wales, who are running the film shows in Wales, to see if the 2 projects can help each other.

Thanks once again for your pointer.

John

Martin Harvey's picture

links

Excellent! Good to hear of links being made.

----
Entomologist and biological recorder