Colin007's picture

What's my wasp?

Observed: 24th July 2013 By: Colin007Colin007’s reputation in InvertebratesColin007’s reputation in InvertebratesColin007’s reputation in InvertebratesColin007’s reputation in Invertebrates
digger 01
digger 02
digger 03
digger 04
Description:

What a great insect - I would really like to know what it is (hope it's not an "impossible to identify from a photo"
Suggested a digger wasp but more to fill the box than with any confidence!

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Ardea's picture

Conops or Thick-headed flies

Conops or Thick-headed flies are parasites of bumblebees, they lay their eggs in the bee by injecting it between the abdominal plates. The larvae then eat the bee - from the inside!

Colin007's picture

Conops or Thick-headed flies

Thanks Adea, looked it up when Chris identified it - does it pick on any particular bumble, or will any do?

Colin

Colin007's picture

Conops quadrifasciatus

Ha, a fly not a wasp at all (should have noticed that it looks a bit like a hoverfly)
Thanks Chris - that was quick!
looked it up and it looks like bad news for the bumble bees!

Colin

stevegregory's picture

Not bad news - just life as it is

Hi Colin

Conops and bumbles have evolved together and have co-existed together in natural balance, probably before humans evolved from chimps. Just part of life's great diversity that I respect and admire. 'nature red in tooth and claw'

It is introduced 'alien' species (e.g. Varrora mite on Honey Bees) that are bad news for our native bee fauna! Here there is no co-evolved natural balance and it all goes pear-shaped for the native species.

Didn't mean to lecture!

Steve
www.bmig.org.uk

Colin007's picture

Not bad news - just life as it is

Hi Steve

Yes - I meant "Bad" in a slightly flippant way - as in bad news for a bumble that comes across one! Difficult to convey meaning in a text. Don't worry about lecturing! All info is very welcome.

Colin

Ardea's picture

Re Aliens

Steve,

I don't think Apis (Honey Bee) is a native!

stevegregory's picture

British Dark Honey Bee?

I agree the Domesticated Honey Bee Apis mellifera - various sub-species - is definitely not native! But I couldn't think of a native bee and pest 'alien' to use as an example (my minds not as sharp as it used to be!). Clutching at straws I could mention the British Dark Honey Bee Apis mellifera mellifera which is (or was) the native Honey Bee in Britain (extinct?)

Cheers :)

Steve