mjop's picture

Moth sp

Observed: 6th July 2013 By: mjopmjop’s reputation in Invertebratesmjop’s reputation in Invertebrates
moth sp
Description:

seems distinctive, but I just cannot identify it

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Common Lutestring (Ochropacha duplaris) interacts

Comments

nightfly's picture

Hi mjop, It looks a lot like

Hi mjop,

It looks a lot like a May Highflyer with the wings pulled closely together unlike the resting posture in the book- July Highflyer certainly does rest like above. At the same time I cant match the markings exactly with the examples in Waring but superficially it looks more like this species than any other in Waring.

Cathal.

mjop's picture

maybe?

Thanks for the comment. I know the highflyers can be very variable, but it just didn't seem to fit any of them quite right (though I'm willing to stand corrected!). It's head was quite tucked back into its neck (note the ginger neck collar!), again, making it not feel quite like most geometrids. When disturbed and resettling it often made it's wings more tent-like (i.e. like a silver-y at rest).

nightfly's picture

Its just Ive seen July

Its just Ive seen July Highflyer doing a fairly good impression of a noctuid also in the past- at first glance, still think May Highflyer is a fair shout but I stand to be corrected also. It might be something else altogether. Did notice the ginger neck, very interesting.

Cathal.

nightfly's picture

Lutestring is a bit more like

Lutestring is a bit more like it, you had a fair idea I was off track there anyway mjop. Ive never seen a Lutestring of any kind, sorry for the blithering nonesense!

Cathal.

mjop's picture

Aha - a lutestring!

Thanks for the comments and ids. At last! - I knew it would be obvious when someone told me - and it explains why it didn't look right for a geometrid. Looking at other's Lutestrings, many of them are down as 'unknown' as well, so it looks like it regularly throws people.

It doesn't help being at p53 in Waring, and illustrated from the side (obvious when I know it, but harder to initially identify it!). It's good to learn.

Michael

nightfly's picture

I agree, good to learn- that

I agree, good to learn- that resting posture depicted in Waring explains what you described above also mjop, the roofed wing posture, or rolled wing.

Cathal.