crobins745's picture

DSC_1671

Observed: 29th June 2013 By: crobins745
DSC_1671
Description:
Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Wildlife Ranger's picture

Mountain Hare

In summer, the all-white upperside to the tail is diagnostic (Brown Hare has a black centre to the tail).

Fur is a grey brown colour in summer, Brown hare is tawny-brown

WLR

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the naturalist man's picture

Hare

This is a difficult one. I can see why Wildlife Ranger says mountain hare, you can not see any black on the tail and the hindquarters are very grey.

However, the ears are too long for mountain hare, on a mountain hare they would not reach the nose if folded down and these are long enough to protrude beyond the nose; mountain hares don't have the pale line from the pale eye ring down the side of the muzzle; and the habitat looks too 'rich' for mountain hare. We can not go by the map as you've put it in what appears to be woodland when the photo is clearly a semi-improved grassland.

I'm erring towards brown hare for the above reasons, older brown hares do go more grey, especially on the hindquarters and the lack of black on the tail could be a trick of the camera angle.

Can you tell us if you saw the hare in the fields on the valley bottom or further up the mountain?

Excellent photo by the way.

Graham Banwell

Visit the iSpot Yorkshire forum for information on events, issues and news relating to 'God's own country'
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Gill Sinclair's picture

Long ears

I know Findhorn is famous for its mountain hares but this animal's ears just look too long. I'm going for brown hare.

Gill Sinclair
OU Certificate in Contemporary Science
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Twitter @Gill_Sinclair

crobins745's picture

Hare

Hare was in the rocks on the mountainside, then
came down (with 2 others), to the valley floor, at the farthest end of Findhorn Valley.

the naturalist man's picture

Hare

Thanks for the clarification. If it was coming down into the valley bottom it was most certainly a brown hare, the mountain hares would not come down to such low altitudes, especially in summer.

Graham Banwell

Visit the iSpot Yorkshire forum for information on events, issues and news relating to 'God's own country'
http://www.ispot.org.uk/forum/8411