darob57's picture

Crane Fly

Observed: 15th June 2013 By: darob57darob57’s reputation in Invertebratesdarob57’s reputation in Invertebratesdarob57’s reputation in Invertebratesdarob57’s reputation in Invertebrates
Crane Fly
Crane Fly
Crane Fly head through lens
Description:

Found dead in old spider's web in lean-to shed. Third photo shows laughable attempt to take photo through x10 lens. By now, it had no legs, one wing and one antenna.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Wildlife Ranger's picture

Tipula

Also oleraceae are more abundant at this end of the year than paludosa

WLR

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stevegregory's picture

WLR is correct - but..

...the last (14th) antennal segment is very small - check carefully! It's much easier, and more reliable, to check the male genitalia!

Steve

Wildlife Ranger's picture

Tipula

If you revise to Genus I think thats a good start Oleraceae and paludosa not easy but a good try

Best Wishes

WLR

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darob57's picture

Thanks

Thanks both for the comments and advice.
I have since found a diagram of the male genitalia of oleraceae, but not paludosa. Didn't quite look right, but don't know how long the fly had been in the web and how damaged it might be.
Did see a comparison between the two species relating to compound eye separation on the ventral side of the head - narrow in oleraceae, wide in paludosa. was narrow on this specimen. Don't know how definitive that is.

Thanks again for the help. I'll change it to genus level if the eyes don't have it.

Dave

Wildlife Ranger's picture

Good keying

Its a pretty good bit of detectiive work either way Dave Craneflies get a wide birth on i-spot I would be more than happy to agree Tipula , but less certain on the evidence for species Here is the eye arrangement

http://bugguide.net/node/view/114019

Best Wishes

WLR

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darob57's picture

Eyes

Thanks for that, WLR. Very similar to the photo of the eye arrangement that I saw on another web site. The now wingless, legless and antennaless (if there is such a word) specimen's eye arrangement is definitely closer to the oleracea photo. (reminds me of male vs. female compound eyes on most hoverfly genera).
OK I'll change it to genus level. Enjoyed the challenge anyway.

Cheers

Dave

Wildlife Ranger's picture

Tipula oleraceae

More of an i-spot thing on definitions etc but I think since you have made the obs and keyed it its reasonable to agree to both what it is likely be ( T oleracea ) and what we defintely know it to be (Tipula ) your observation I believe holds more weight because you have sought and provided evidence for it as it stands

Best wishes & Keep keying ;-)

WLR

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darob57's picture

All very interesting

..and to think I only went into the shed to put a pair of loppers away..

Cheers

Dave

stevegregory's picture

I agree with WLR

It is useful to have a probable (species) ID and a certain (genus) ID.

Keep going with the observations - and IDs

Steve

darob57's picture

Thanks Steve

Certainly will...

Will be in Dorset for a few days soon, so looking forward to some different species on heath and limestone/chalk grasslands.

Dave

Wildlife Ranger's picture

"Cranespotter"

Who would have thought Dave - A cranespotter. thread - enjoy your trip and Nature !!

Best Wishes

WLR

Whats Happening with Nature ??? Visit the Nature Blog

http://florafaunauk.blogspot.co.uk/

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Supporting FEET Conservation work & Biodiversity Recording

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