dejayM's picture

Yellow Ascidian

Observed: 3rd June 2013 By: dejayM
Biological Recording In ScotlandHighland Biological Recording GroupOrkney Biodiversity Records Centre
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normal
contrasted
raised
both
Description:

A failed attempt to demystify the yellow Ascidian in http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/332150
I spent a good hour searching for perfect specimens of this 'different' variety.
There were plenty to choose from, suggesting that this variation, or intermediate stage, is common here.
Picture 2 is deliberately contrasted.
Botrylloides schosseri is seen in picture 4
It now requires some input from others

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

dejayM's picture

version

Good pictures here http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/218735?nav=related
by ChrisMcA show the proper yellow version of Botryllus schlosseri (which I have yet to find)
........
I recently edited the name in this comment
ð

ChrisMcA's picture

http://www.exoticsguide.org/b

http://www.exoticsguide.org/botryllus_schlosseri ,Which is from american pacific coast gives much detail.
(my guess on the yellow ones was they might be dying, maybe at end of their lifespan)

dejayM's picture

where..?

Yes, that's a nice informative link Chris, thanks.
You may be right about dying. But, generally, the test and overall quality looked sound. And there was a lot of it in different places.
"Colonies that develop from larvae that settle in the spring live for about 3 months and those that develop from fall settlers live for about 8 months..." is telling but where are others' pictures or direct references to dying colonies?

JoC's picture

Botryllus schlosseri

is the accepted name for what we call the star ascidian. I think these photos are all B. schlosseri, albeit some a bit unusual.
Botrylloides is a different genus. Botrylloides leachii is the species with the more parallel rows zooids.
Which begs the question - can they hybridise?

Jo

dejayM's picture

examples..

I have yet to see a 'classic' (similar to others' illustrations) example of either.
Quite an interesting question though (and unlikely, considering the literature) but I would expect the zooid-form to be a little similar to either; perhaps also the test colour.
I can imagine, as I gather more experience and examples, that we might be having this discussion again.

I have amended the ID..with apologies to gramandy.

ChrisMcA's picture

Though there are now 2

Though there are now 2 Botrylloides sp's B.violaceus is "well established in harbours and marinas along the south coast of England, plus the east coast as far north as Grimsby, and in Milford Haven (Wales)[last update 2011]".

JoC's picture

B. violaceus

Thanks Chris, I did not know this 'exotic' was in Britain.
Jo

Jo

ChrisMcA's picture

Neither did I Jo

Neither did I Jo

dejayM's picture

well read..

Amazingly, I did, having read and read and read. At first I thought my very red one
http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/335678 WAS B.violaceus.
The MarLIN map shows it well established.

dejayM's picture

a while

It has taken me a while to agree to Chris's ID. Not because I didn't accept it but because I wanted to 'listen' to more comment.
We accept that it might be a damaged or naturally dying - they are not long lived.