dejayM's picture

Fly of the death

Observed: 24th May 2013 By: dejayM
Biological Recording In ScotlandHighland Biological Recording GroupOrkney Biodiversity Records Centre
dejayM’s reputation in InvertebratesdejayM’s reputation in InvertebratesdejayM’s reputation in InvertebratesdejayM’s reputation in Invertebrates
face
blue
wings
hairs and feet
flaps a
Description:

My first real foray into the Diptera. No easy beginner-subject but this might be a good place to start. Lovely fresh specimen, sleepy and co-operative - as you see.
Nice helpful site here -
http://www.tuin-thijs.com/vliegen-calliphoridae-engels.htm

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

dejayM's picture

wings

Picture four. Is this a set of tiny, well formed and useless wings I see?

ophrys's picture

Useless wings

Be careful what you say...you don't want a visit from the 'dog-fly of the dead'!

As a fly, it is di-ptera and so has two wings. What you can see is presumably the squamae, sort of flap-like structures under the wing, between the wing bases and the halteres. They are sometimes useful in ID for the hairs on them, the colour of their fringe or similar.

Or, maybe you are looking at the alula, that flap at the base of the wing which is actually part of the wing proper?

Ian
_________________

My Flickr photos...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/52163027@N02/

dejayM's picture

hand...

Well it's nice to be visited by so many experts - why don't you all try your hand at Marine Inverts?

Yes, those little wings Ian. I see them in Pic.4 and Pic 2 as tiny transparent wing-like appendages just south of the thorax.
See new picture 5
ðj

ophrys's picture

Alula

Yup, that is the alula, part of the wing proper, near the base.

On experts...you've only been visited by one!

Ian
_________________

My Flickr photos...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/52163027@N02/

dejayM's picture

claims

....fancy you not claiming to be an expert Ian!
Goodness (alula)
http://rsif.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/early/2011/11/01/rsif.201...
"..the mid-upstroke angle of incidence and the timing of pronation at the end of the upstroke were not significantly associated with the state of the alula..."
I might just have to go back to the shoreline..
ðj