dejayM's picture

Chiton

Observed: 6th May 2013 By: dejayM
Biological Recording In ScotlandHighland Biological Recording GroupOrkney Biodiversity Records Centre
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Description:

A Chiton yes - but a softer 'shield' of plates than I have previously observed.
Indeed, its whole structure seemed somehow different.
See Comments

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

dejayM's picture

locate..

I don't somehow think that this is a normal specimen of Lepidochitona cinereus, if at all. But I cannot locate good likenesses on the web or in any of my books.
Certainly pretty low down in the tide-line.
I was left with one overriding feature - leathery.
Might this be Leptochiton asellus? (Lepidopleurus asellus in my book)
http://species-identification.org/species.php?species_group=mollusca&id=757

JoC's picture

Leptochiton cancellatus is possible id.

See what you think. I suggest this as this species is about twice as long as broad, narrower girdle than most chitons, valves strongly arched, and rounded dorsally. Up to 9mm - any size for your beasts?
L. asellus is up to 18mm and 1.5 x as long as broad.

Jo

dejayM's picture

careless

How careless and stupid NOT to record size.
I only remember it not being much, if any, bigger than Lepidochitona cinereus.
So, shall we say 8 or 9mm?
And I believe it to be wider than normal
Puts is firmly in the range of Leptochiton cancellatus.
Which is less common in Orkney than L.asellus (NBN Portal)
I guess you looked here Jo -
http://species-identification.org/species.php?species_group=mollusca&id=758
It describes it very well - strongly arched, girdle narrow particularly.
I have put it up as an ID in case someone else (who knows) comes.
Thanks
ðj

dejayM's picture

misdirect..

Now I notice that iSpot links this to Leptochiton scabridus.
"Leptochiton scabridus can be found at extreme low water and sublittorally attached to stones or pebbles which are often embedded in sand to a depth of 10-20 cm." MarLin
I wonder on what basis iSpot overrides IDs?
It is almost certainly NOT this, as it is only listed for the south of UK and must be rare anyway.
ð

JoC's picture

It would surprise me if

this were L. scabridus for the reasons you point out. As usual, I looked in Hayward and Ryland, the book, though the site you mention is based on the same book (presumably with copyright permissions!). I have agreed your L. cancellatus.
I expect the link to L. scabridus is just a mistake; someone may notice it and change it; or not.

Jo

dejayM's picture

case..

Thanks again Jo - on the case as always. I appreciate it.
As for L.scabridus, well it seems to reside buried (if I am reading it properly) - not ours then!
New today -
http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/330461
Also note that
L.cinereus is now the preferred L.cinerea
http://species-identification.org/species.php?species_group=mollusca&men...
(oh dear!)
THAT might account for ID panel 'mistake'.
ðj