gelsdon1's picture

IMG_0273

Observed: 10th May 2013 By: gelsdon1
IMG_0273
IMG_0281
Description:
Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Carrion Crow (Corvus corone) interacts

Comments

gelsdon1's picture

Can anyone identify this

Can anyone identify this bird?

G Elsdon

cerigait's picture

Not Albino :)

Albino would have no pigment at all and would more than likely be white with pink eyes. This has pigment but it is a very dilute colour.

Still a really facinating find. Fantastic!

Wicstun's picture

Bill colour

Would bill change colour along with feathers if some albino? Bill is white like rook? I have seem Blackbirds with lots of white presumably not true albino? So why has this crow got white beak too?

Thanks

Mark Thompson

Discovering-Our-Countryside.co.uk

mark@agriculture-4-u.co.uk

cerigait's picture

Not certain sorry. :)

On a basic level I think that it is a genetic mutation, and can vary in its distribution and severity from individual to individual.

Some I have seen have had individual patches of bleached feathers. So looked like very odd Magpies indeed at a glance, and others have all over dilution of colour like this bird.

I think that Leucism can result in the colour uptake in different tisssues varying, depending on where the genes are mutated. Perhaps this is why the beak is different to the feathers and the eyes etc.

If anyone knows how this all happens and can point us in the right direction, I'd love to know more.

Ceri

P.S. In welsh a "Y fran wen" or White Crow, is a mythical bird that is believed to carry tales about your misbehaviour and tells your darkest secrets to all around....

Perhaps its a good job that its just a bit pale and not white ehh! ;)

grahamcsmith's picture

Leucistic

Yes this is a leucistic bird, not an albino. Leucism is a reduction in all pigments, albinism is an absence of melanin. You can find leucistic morphs of most animals and they are generally more common than albinos.

Amadan's picture

Leucism

Has been linked to general poor condition, resulting from illness, parasites, or malnutrition of the individual affected. It can also result from genetics as well, I believe.

the naturalist man's picture

Leucism

I give a detailed description of albanism and leucism here:

http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/4725

It's an old post but I don't know of thinking having changed recently.

Graham Banwell

Visit the iSpot Yorkshire forum for information on events, issues and news relating to 'God's own country'
http://www.ispot.org.uk/forum/8411