scubamann's picture

Purple primrose?

Observed: 2nd May 2013 By: scubamannscubamann’s reputation in Plantsscubamann’s reputation in Plantsscubamann’s reputation in Plants
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Description:

A purple and yellow flower that is growing amongst or with yellow primrose. It has the same leaves and is the exactly the same size as the yellow ones so I think it not Bird's-eye primrose, but mat be a cross.
It is redder in real life than in the photos

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Primrose (Primula vulgaris) interacts

Comments

Dluogs's picture

This happens fairly often and

This happens fairly often and I have always been under the impression that it's more likely when people have planted garden primula varieties somewhere nearby, i.e. a cross. However, it might also be a naturally occurring phenomenon. Hopefully someone will give you a more definitive answer. We always dig our pink ones up.

scubamann's picture

variation

Thanks. In this instance the site is a good few metres from any garden, and across a busy road (though that may be a way for "carriage" by winds/cars, rather than isloation). There was a large cluster about 2m across [I will add a picture if I can find it] and they were all mixed, so I suspect a natural variation - but it was the colour that caught my eye and I pulled up to photo it.
I rather think it is prettier than the yellow, but that is all subjective.
Geoffrey.

Dluogs's picture

When looking at whether a

When looking at whether a wild population has been affected by garden cultivars, you have to consider how far bees travel.

scubamann's picture

Good point

I am pretty ignorant about land plants, and did not realise that the pollination could produce these crosses in the wild.
I cannot find my photo of the mass group, but they are just down the road so I can go back and re-take it.
I am about to post a sighting of a possible primrose with half-white flowers. Ah, I have just seen another posting that demonstrates this variation, so will not be doing so.
Maybe this is the same effect (or I have got my identification wrong again). Or it is an ageing thing - do they fade towards the end of their flowering? I have seen similar in lesser celandines.

Geoffrey

markwilson's picture

pink primmies

There's an article in the laest edition of the BSBI news about this

scubamann's picture

BSBI ?

Thanks for the comment, but what is BSBI ?
[I am not being facetious, I genuinely do not know].

lavateraguy's picture

For the BSBI (Botanical Society of the British Isles) see ...

scubamann's picture

Many thanks.

Many thanks.