PaulChallinor's picture

Wolf spider

Observed: 21st April 2013 By: PaulChallinorPaulChallinor’s reputation in InvertebratesPaulChallinor’s reputation in InvertebratesPaulChallinor’s reputation in InvertebratesPaulChallinor’s reputation in Invertebrates
Pardosa amentata_13-04-21_06
Pardosa amentata_13-04-21_05
Pardosa amentata_13-04-21_07
Description:

Found under a plank of wood in the veg patch. No evidence of a web.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

PaulChallinor's picture

Alan Thanks for the suggestion

Can you provide me with some pointers - new to this and I have to admit to a great deal of ignorance. And need all the help I can get.

Alan Thornhill's picture

Hi Paul

1) the first thing that struck me was that the legs and palps look too long and slender to be a Pardosa. But if you want more evidence -

2) the posterior median eyes are too small. Zoom in on your first photo and compare with the head on photos on these pages -
http://www.eurospiders.com/Malthonica_pagana.htm (an agelenid)
http://www.eurospiders.com/Pardosa_amentata.htm

3) the pattern on the abdomen doesn't match P.amentata. Compare yours with the pattern on the Tegenaria on this page - particularly the pale patches at the front of the abdomen.
http://www.insecte.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=42036

4) You say no evidence of a web and yet I can see lots of silk in the photos. It looks like you destroyed a web lifting the plank. There are Tegenaria species (or Malthonica) that live outdoors.

PaulChallinor's picture

Alan thanks again for the help

These were a great help. When I get back home I'll try and get some better photos to see if this helps to get a more accurate ID. Im beginning to understand the difficulties encountered with insects and spiders in particular.

PaulChallinor's picture

Alan thanks again for the help

These were a great help. When I get back home I'll try and get some better photos to see if this helps to get a more accurate ID. Im beginning to understand the difficulties encountered with insects and spiders in particular.

Alan Thornhill's picture

Unfortunately

with most agelenids (or lycosids) I don't think better photos will help much unless they can show details of the epigyne (adult female) or palp (adult male). I think you need to get a specimen under the microscope. Probably only about 10% of UK spiders can be IDd from photos that don't show such details.

PaulChallinor's picture

Understood

Much more difficult the more I learn. Give me a patient And a dialysis machine andi Ican work wonders. So much to learn!

Alan Thornhill's picture

Hi Jennilouise

I think T. silvestris is the most likely ID but I can't be sure (so can't really agree)