hart.kris1's picture

American Wren

Observed: 3rd April 2013 By: hart.kris1hart.kris1’s reputation in Birdshart.kris1’s reputation in Birds
2013-04-03 17.34.30
Description:

Possible Cat fatility. Is this a Wren or a Winter Wren or neither?

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

chrisbrooks's picture

ID comment

The Latin name should be Troglodytes troglodytes

hart.kris1's picture

I thought the native Wren was

I thought the native Wren was called Troglodytes troglodytes unlike its American cousin?

chrisbrooks's picture

UK

Sorry, I thought this was a UK bird.

ophrys's picture

American?

Am I missing something...was this taken in America? The location is in England...

Ian
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/52163027@N02/

Jeff Rothwell's picture

Winter wren

Hi, the UK native bird is called a Winter Wren with the taxonomic name of Troglodytes troglodytes. Most people truncate the name to Wren.

hart.kris1's picture

Yankee confusion

Sorry for any confusion, I found this bird today, assummed it was Troglodytes troglodytes. Then I noticed the rather long and curved beak unlike the native Wren. Had a quick look on the Web and apparently Troglodytes hiemalis has been found outside of N.America, notably in Europe. So what I am really asking is, is this true and is this an American invader lying dead in the back garden?

ophrys's picture

Beak

That is exactly what a Wren's beak looks like...surprisingly long, but good for getting spiders out of crevices in bark. I can't believe that Troglodytes hiemalis has been found in Europe.

Ian
_________________

My Flickr photos...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/52163027@N02/

ophrys's picture

Winter Wren

Whether taken in this country or America, it is essentially Troglodytes troglodytes. Just wondered why the title and the location don't agree?

Ian
_________________

My Flickr photos...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/52163027@N02/

Peter Pearson's picture

When is a wren a wren ?

I really don't know what is going on. In the good old days birdwatching was a super hobby, now it seems to be everyone tying to get their names in the record book spotting a feather out of place or beak a mm longer or shorter adding new and often inappropriate names i.e the winter wren is not our LBJ. Lets get back to preserving what little we have left now and worrying less about minutia.

DavidHowdon's picture

But is it new

If I look back at an old guide like Witherby et al (mine is the 1952 reprint) the taxonomic unit of identification was the sub-species. Subsequently (and probably with the rise of non-lethal field birding as a hobby) most identification guides seem to have moved back up to species as the taxonomic level of choice (with a few honourable exceptions like White Wagtail).

Just fashion I expect.

Personally I like that people choose to look at a bird in detail and think carefully about what it could be and where it could be from - but I'll not be measuring the bill of every wren I see on my local patch.

Peter Pearson's picture

wren

I agree that it is right and interesting spotting 'foreign invaders',weather conditions and tracking their movement adds to the interest. But not to the detriment of our own 'natives'. Unfortunately it seems to me that attempting to rename and 'make' new species, not just birds, but most things natural, has overtaken an interest in what we have naturally all around us.(Here I go again, sounds a bit like Victor Mildrew I suppose)