hydrurga's picture

Unidentified Larch

Observed: 27th March 2013 By: hydrurgahydrurga’s reputation in Plantshydrurga’s reputation in Plantshydrurga’s reputation in Plantshydrurga’s reputation in Plants
Unidentified Larch
Unidentified Larch
Unidentified Larch
Unidentified Larch
Unidentified Larch
Description:

2 ids, 6 comments.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which European Larch (Larix decidua) interacts

Comments

dejayM's picture

three sorts

Three sorts of Larch in Scotland.
European, Japanese and, inevitably, Hybrid larch - Larix × marschlinsii.
You may need some green beginnings or the gorgeous little flower buds to separate them.

lavateraguy's picture

Instructions for identification by cones ...

... were provided recently

http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/318658

On the basis of this I think that the cones make it Larix kaempferi.

hydrurga's picture

Larch

First of all, many thanks indeed to you all for your help with this.

I have to say that I agree with lavateraguy that going by Rachy's picture these cones look like Larix kaempferi or, at a pinch, the hybrid. So, I'm going to wait until the flowers start budding.

@dejayM: What should I be looking for in the flower buds or green beginnings in order to determine the species?

Pete
www.leptonyx.com/nature/

dejayM's picture

WikkiPic

T'is my experience that, particularly with mature larch, the cones are not always distinctive. Rachy's picture is excellent but it's rare to get two of them in the hand to compare.
L.decidua (European Larch) has this wonderful Wikkipic here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Illustration_Larix_decudua0.jpg and the details given in The Collins Tree Guide (Library?) might help you understand the earliest signs - which, as I said, should be beginning with you now.
L.kaempferi (Japanese Larch) is very common in Forstry stands - it's rare to find a mix-planting though.
Grab a small new-growth frond and take it home. If you pass the Forester on the way, she will tell you immediately and, if you are sampling from a block of similars, the planting record will give you all you need (Grid Refs needed). The Forest Offices are ALWAYS eager to help in these issues and who knows where that contact will lead.
The RFS site here http://www.rfs.org.uk/learning/Larch is good enough to eat (and understated) but seems only to deal with L.decidua in this case.
Derek

Ambroise's picture

Hi sorry updated teh ID

Hi sorry updated teh ID without seeing the comments - looks more like the L. kaepferi to me but I'm not that experienced.
Best Wishes

hydrurga's picture

Larch

I'm going to hold off until the buds and then leaves come out to try and firm an id. Unfortunately the tree isn't in a managed forest so no forester's knowledge to draw on. Poland and Clement's Vegetative Key has some interesting pointers on the differences between the leaves of all 3 options, and I'll try to take cone and leaf samples from all 4 Larches found at various points in the path and see what I can come up with. Thanks for all your help with this!

Pete
www.leptonyx.com/nature/