Paul Roberts's picture

Black curvilinear forms on dead wood.

Observed: 13th March 2013 By: Paul RobertsPaul Roberts’s reputation in Fungi and LichensPaul Roberts’s reputation in Fungi and LichensPaul Roberts’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
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Description:

I tried hard to find an ID for this but I can't even tell whether this is fungus, lichen, alga or the result of bacteria or something else. Found several times in this wood. Would dearly love to know what it is. This collapsed coppice is probably Ash (somewhat hard to tell under the snow, moss and general decay).

Identifications

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Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Honey Fungus (Armillaria mellea) interacts

Comments

D.M.H.'s picture

Not honey fungus as these are

Not honey fungus as these are not bootlaces which grow on the wood not in it, but it is the result of a fungus. Think you will need to find a fruitbody to have a chance at species.

Www.facebook.com/Dorset.Mushroom.Hunters.

All given ID's are subject to error/ommissions. Please seek independent verification before acting on ANY advice given. BE SAFE =)

Mark at Magdalen's picture

Is this the same as spalting

Is this the same as spalting that you see in carved beech wood?

Paul Roberts's picture

Not Honey Fungus

Thanks Mark and D.M.H., I had a look for the tell-tale "bootlaces" and there's nothing resembling them here. So, I agree with D.M.H., not Armillaria. I visit this spot regularly and will add a picture of fruit bodies if I find them, there were none visible when I took these pictures. BTW Mark I have posted a fairly good pic of Armillaria "bootlaces" found about 20 meters from this location, see my obs 25th Feb if you want to take a look.

Mark at Magdalen's picture

More than ready to concede I

More than ready to concede I was wrong. I can see now that these lines are stains in the wood and are not structures running over the surface. Ta

Paul Roberts's picture

No problem

No problem Mark, trial and error is a very good way to learn stuff and it's a large part of how this site works. Don't let it put you off. Paul

Paul Roberts's picture

Fruiting Bodies - Puffballs

Added picture of puffballs found on one of the trunks of this collapsed coppice. They were probably under the snow when I took the original pictures. I can't really tell whether these have any connection to the black markings in the wood. Not sure which species of puffball, they do not appear to have any spines. Surface very dry and papery. Mass of grey-brown dusty spores inside.

Paul Roberts's picture

Fruiting Bodies - Puffballs

Added picture of puffballs found on one of the trunks of this collapsed coppice. They were probably under the snow when I took the original pictures. I can't really tell whether these have any connection to the black markings in the wood. Not sure which species of puffball, they do not appear to have any spines. Surface very dry and papery. Mass of grey-brown dusty spores inside.