Vaughan college's picture

Cork winged t

Observed: 26th February 2013 By: Vaughan collegeVaughan college’s reputation in PlantsVaughan college’s reputation in PlantsVaughan college’s reputation in Plants
2013-02-26 16.11.49
Description:

"Cork winged twig" on elm. Is this caused by a virus or perhaps Ulmus Thomasii?-

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Elm (Ulmus) interacts

Comments

moremoth's picture

Wings

There are many young elms in this area, and they all have those corky wings.

Bill Welch

dejayM's picture

Wings

My memory tells me that this is a natural feature of elms stems.
I also think it might be a feature of Field Maple - perhaps.
"There are no trees in Orkney" Darwin
dj
Orkney

Rachy Ramone's picture

Corky wings...

...occur in three trees (at least), two of which are commonly found out and about in the UK.

The common ones are Field Maple (Acer campestre) and Elm species.

Easy to tell the difference: Elm have alternate buds, as seen above, whereas Field Maple have opposite buds, ie in pairs opposite each other.

The third one is really obscure, it's a corky variety of Liquidamber that cropped up here a while ago. For comparison, check it out: http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/314694

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

lavateraguy's picture

Add a shrub ...

... (Euonymus alatus) to the mix.

[And I saw a plant in an arboretum labelled as Euonymus europaeus with corky wings as well - but it might have been a mislabelled E. alatus.]

ulmusenthu's picture

corky barked elm

Several varieties of elm have corky bark branchlets. The best one is Ulmus thomasii as you suggested. This one is not of that species. Others include Ulmus minor var suberosa, which this one most possibly is. There is also Ulmus alata and Ulmus x hollaandica 'Major' (The Dutch elm). Dutch elm is very corky, up to 2cm thick on branchlets. It is very common in southern engalnd and mature trees can be found around Edinburgh in Scotland. Ulmus minor var suberosa is still found as a tree, one that comes to mind stands near Dollis Brook, north London.

dejayM's picture

just outside

Peter (ulmusenthu)
You must be a good guy to have 'around'.
Can you post some stuff about Elms in general and say a few things about how it is doing, generally.
Here we do have witch elm a'plenty - does that count?
ðj
Orkney (just outside Scotland)