Paul Roberts's picture

Armillaria Sp.?

Observed: 25th February 2013 By: Paul RobertsPaul Roberts’s reputation in Fungi and LichensPaul Roberts’s reputation in Fungi and LichensPaul Roberts’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
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Description:

Black tubular structures following the grain of rotting tree trunk (so rotten I can't identify the tree).

Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Boot Lace fungus, Honey fungus (Armillaria) interacts

Comments

GrizzledBadger's picture

Elm often has a contorted

Elm often has a contorted grain like this, making it very difficult to split and so a very tough wood which resists splitting / cracking when used inside. Wooden chair seats were often made of Elm also wall panels. Elm was/is used in the constuction of cart wheels, I believe it may have been used in the hub as it had to take the mortices for the spokes.

Brock

Paul Roberts's picture

Not Elm

Thanks Brock but no Elm reported in these woods or anywhere nearby. The trunk is long and comparatively straight which, in this location, suggests either Silver Birch or Ash. Hornbeam and Oak also possibilities. No trace of any bark left to make a better ID I'm afraid. Paul

markwilson's picture

bootlace

from http://www.uksafari.com/honeyfungus.htm

"Honey fungus rhizomorphs can spread up to 9m (30ft) away from the original infected plant. One species of honey fungus (Armillaria ostoyae) in America is believed to be the largest living organism on earth. It grows in the Malheur National Forest in east Oregon and is 3.5 miles across."

From distant memory when you scratch the outer black covering of the rhizomorph you can see the white hyphae inside

Paul Roberts's picture

bootlace

Thanks Mark, yes, I've been reading up on Armillaria. It hit the headlines as the "Humungus Fungus". As a new woodland-owner I'm finding it scary and awe inspiring on several levels. One site says that the hyphae are bio-luminescent. Is this true?

D.M.H.'s picture

faintly green

http://www.mycologia.org/content/99/3/341.short

Www.facebook.com/Dorset.Mushroom.Hunters.

All given ID's are subject to error/ommissions. Please seek independent verification before acting on ANY advice given. BE SAFE =)

markwilson's picture

bioluminescence

Yes Armillaria is supposed to bioluminesce but I have never seen it. It would probably need to be on a moonless night. Many reports were from mines where the fungi were on pit props. Why it should happen is more problematic

See

http://inamidst.com/lights/foxfire

Paul Roberts's picture

bioluminescence

Thanks Mark and D.M.H., we're hoping to spend the night in this spot sometime as soon as the weather warms up a bit. We'll be taking the cameras and we'll see if we can get some long exposure pictures of "foxfire" if it is present.
Paul

D.M.H.'s picture

Breaking open the decaying

Breaking open the decaying wood should give best results as its only the active mycelium that glows :-)

Www.facebook.com/Dorset.Mushroom.Hunters.

All given ID's are subject to error/ommissions. Please seek independent verification before acting on ANY advice given. BE SAFE =)