moremoth's picture

Cave Spider.

Observed: 24th February 2013 By: moremothmoremoth’s reputation in Invertebratesmoremoth’s reputation in Invertebratesmoremoth’s reputation in Invertebratesmoremoth’s reputation in Invertebratesmoremoth’s reputation in Invertebrates
Cave Spider.
Cave Spider, male.
Cave spider egg sac.
Description:

They might alternatively be Meta bourneti. These were in Combe Bank caves.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

dennis trunecka's picture

Cave Spider.

Meta menardi and Meta bourneti are very similar and would need to be examined closely to differentiate them.
Meta bourneti do not usually have annulated legs as these have.

mattprince1969's picture

No records for any Meta from that square on the SRS

You do need a good close up of the male palps or the female epigyne to be sure of the species.

However I don't see any record for Meta from this 10Km square, nor for the related threshold species metellina merianae so its worth pursing imho.

Is it in a difficult to access cave complex?

dennis trunecka's picture

Cave Spider.

There are no records of Meta menardi on the SRS anywhere near where I live, nevertheless one was discovered in total darkness under my garden shed!

mattprince1969's picture

Sorry my comment came across wrong...

What I meant was.. its a potential new dot on the map.. certainly not "it can't be that".

Troglodytes do crop up in unusual places, and spiders are massively under-recorded.

I had what I think is porhomma egeria last weekend. Another cave loving species. No obvious caves present. No previous records for the vice county. I think Chris Proctor is correct [I'm sure he wrote an article about this somewhere] when he talks about micro-habitat for troglodyte species, explaining how they crop up in sub-optimal places.

The important question is, Dennis... are there still no m.m. records for your square?

Kind Regards,
Matt

moremoth's picture

Access?

These were in an icehouse which is very thoroughly locked. The keyholder is a licensed bat conservationist. It's a bit further west than the GPS coordinates suggest; I think the camera was using the last coordinates it had before going into the cave. I think it is the same icehouse which is described here as a listed building, also with the wrong coordinates: http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-449223-ice-house-adjoining-pa...
If not, it's a coincidence to find two icehouses on one property.

Bill Welch

moremoth's picture

Meta merianae

My photos were sent (by someone else) to Edward Milner, the London Natural History Society's arachnid recorder, and he wrote back saying they were Meta merianae; though one of my photos (maybe not one of those shown here?) was probably Nesticus cellulanus.

Bill Welch

mattprince1969's picture

if you are looking for a photo of nesticus...

Select one with..

1) very few spines on fore tibia
2) dark circles on the abdomen

As for these pictures, neither are nesticus.

I did wonder about meta meriane, and I can see now that photo #1 is the same as your later observation by the looks of it. The lack of clear spots on femur 1 was the feature that tempted me to meta menardi rather than metellina.

The only thing I'd say for certain here, without seeing palps clearly is 'tetragnathidae'.