charlie streets's picture

Disc fung on dung for ID.

Observed: 22nd February 2013 By: charlie streetscharlie streets’s reputation in Fungi and Lichenscharlie streets’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
Description:

Found on cow dung and 1 1/2mm across..

Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

flaxton's picture

C stercorea has star shaped

C stercorea has star shaped hairs on the outside C fimicola looks the same but has no stellate hairs so this could be either.

charlie streets's picture

Hi Mal, would a photo of the

Hi Mal, would a photo of the underside be of any help?

flaxton's picture

I think it is unlikely but

I think it is unlikely but put one up and we can check it.

D.M.H.'s picture

Put just the genus for now

Put just the genus for now and if you get any microscopy info later update to species.

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All given ID's are subject to error/ommissions. Please seek independent verification before acting on ANY advice given. BE SAFE =)

charlie streets's picture

Yep, well said DMH, I had a

Yep, well said DMH, I had a look at the underside and couldn't see anything useful. I have retained a portion of the dung to see if anything else pops up.I have also developed an interest in rearing dung fungi so watch this space!

miked's picture

Is late winter/early spring

Is late winter/early spring the best time to look out for dung fungi?

flaxton's picture

Just reading Dung Fungi of

Just reading Dung Fungi of New Zealand and it reckons autumn and winter give the largest number of species but I thing there will always be things appearing if you "cultivate" a specimen.

D.M.H.'s picture

Not much else

At that time of year. Dont think I'm going to be looking at dung during Cep season to have comparison lol :-D

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All given ID's are subject to error/ommissions. Please seek independent verification before acting on ANY advice given. BE SAFE =)

miked's picture

Are all the NZ species

Are all the NZ species introductions, not sure there is anything native there to produce suitable dung.

flaxton's picture

Mike My education is lacking

Mike
My education is lacking I didn't realise there were no native mammals (other than bats). As that is the case you are probably right and the dung fungi are all imports.

D.M.H.'s picture

Moa

There are coprolites from the two species of Giant Moa. Being herbivours and given their size I guess this was not to different being undigested plant material.

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All given ID's are subject to error/ommissions. Please seek independent verification before acting on ANY advice given. BE SAFE =)

D.M.H.'s picture

introduced, always seems to

introduced, always seems to imply man transported the spores in his entourage. Could the lack of suitable dung not be the determining factor? Colonising species employing natural methods having failed to succeed previously and mans responsibility purely circumstantial?

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All given ID's are subject to error/ommissions. Please seek independent verification before acting on ANY advice given. BE SAFE =)

miked's picture

I have been (very slightly)

I have been (very slightly) interested in NZ fungi since being there and seeing A. muscaria on nothofagus (http://www.amanita-photolibrary.co.uk/photo_library/New_Zealand/nz95_ama...), then wondering if the Amanita was already there or if it came in with all the imported trees. There is a similar situation in South Africa where quite a number of the fungi are associated with introduced species of plants or other non native things.

charlie streets's picture

My original query has been

My original query has been answered. It's Cheilymenia fimicola.Thanks to Nick Alpin for his time and expertise.