w00dyphyl's picture

Mystery Galium

Observed: 30th January 2013 By: w00dyphylw00dyphyl’s reputation in Plantsw00dyphyl’s reputation in Plantsw00dyphyl’s reputation in Plants
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Description:

Not sure about this Galium, its has waxy upper leaves bit doesnt look quite right for G.glaucum, its square stemmed and has leaves in whorls of 6 or 8, leaf length is around 3cm, any ideas anyone? Thanks

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Woodruff (Galium odoratum) interacts

Comments

lavateraguy's picture

Galium glaucum ...

... has not been recorded in the UK.

Have you a photograph?

w00dyphyl's picture

Ive attached a few, its

Ive attached a few, its growing on the rocks next to a sheltered pond, hope this helps, thanks for your time

Ray Arigho's picture

Galium sp.

Leaf size, shape, number and 'sheen', and the habit and habitat lead me to Galium
odoratum (Sweet woodruff). Did it smell
of coumarin (sweet, similar to mown grass) when handled?

lavateraguy's picture

I was thinking it was too tall ...

... for Galium odoratum, but perhaps I'm misinterpreting the photograph.

Rachy Ramone's picture

I agree...

...it looks way too tall for G. odoratum.

But I also agree that photos can be difficult to interpret.

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

w00dyphyl's picture

I too now think its

I too now think its G.odoratum, I found an old wildflower book that suggests tiny forward pointing spines on the leaf margins along with a hairless stem, this combined with the other evidence (including) photographs leads me to odoratum. Is it unusual to see it at this time of year?,

Thanks for your help everyone, this is fun

Rachy Ramone's picture

Not unusual at this time, in that condition...

... if it is G. odoratum, then it does look about right for this time of year, ie a bit tired and tatty. Come spring, new growth will appear, followed by very pretty starry white flowers, and all this old foliage will rot away.

Usually, it is easy to ID by smell - as mentioned above - as it has a lovely scent, something like fresh hay: but that might not help you now, as the old foliage will not have much of a smell.

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY