lauracunningham's picture

P1090051

Observed: 9th January 2013 By: lauracunningham
P1090051
P1090049
Description:

approximately 10cm across

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

nightfly's picture

I haven't heard that term for

I haven't heard that term for it before Chris, wonder how it came about?

I think the tell tale black ova are visible on the lower left of the jelly.

Cathal.

chrisbrooks's picture

Star Jelly

Hi Cathal, I got it from this link

http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/101544?nav=search

I think this is the frog version.

Chris

nightfly's picture

Cheers Chris, I finally got

Cheers Chris,
I finally got around to checking out your link. Thanks for that. It looks just as the frog version I am familiar with does, but do you know if the toad version is distinguishable? There are no toads over here so I wouldn't have seen it.

Thanks again.

Cathal.

chrisbrooks's picture

Frogs / Toads

Sorry Cathal I have no idea at all, though I have never heard mention of toads in any debate on the matter. Chris

nightfly's picture

I know they dont seem to get

I know they dont seem to get the 'blame' much, other than being included alongside 'frog' in some IDs of this jelly on iSpot, but as they are anatomically similar could they not also produce a similar phenomenon?

I dont even know what toad spawn looks like to be honest, must google it.

Cathal.

chrisbrooks's picture

Toad spawn

It is in long strings

D.M.H.'s picture

Toads secrete toxic

Toads secrete toxic chemicals, frogs do not.

Www.facebook.com/Dorset.Mushroom.Hunters.

All given ID's are subject to error/ommissions. Please seek independent verification before acting on ANY advice given. BE SAFE =)

D.M.H.'s picture

Rumoured to occur after

Rumoured to occur after meteor storms I believe

Www.facebook.com/Dorset.Mushroom.Hunters.

All given ID's are subject to error/ommissions. Please seek independent verification before acting on ANY advice given. BE SAFE =)

Thistle's picture

DNA

My understanding is that samples of "star jelly" (aka various other names) have been shown not to contain any DNA. Surely if they were from a frog - or any other animal - there would be some detectable DNA, especially if, as is often suggested, there are remnants of spawn visible in the jelly?

Ian

nightfly's picture

Hi Ian,To the lower left of

Hi Ian,

To the lower left of the main body of jelly is the mass of black ova I refer to. It is showing some signs of decay as it is beginning to go white as it does the longer it is exposed to the elements. When freshly exposed it is jet black.

Cathal.

D.M.H.'s picture

http://www.examiner.com/artic

http://www.examiner.com/article/star-jelly-space-goo-appearing-edinburgh.... at the end is an "expert" informing us that not finding DNA in undeveloped frog spawn is quite normal

Www.facebook.com/Dorset.Mushroom.Hunters.

All given ID's are subject to error/ommissions. Please seek independent verification before acting on ANY advice given. BE SAFE =)

Thistle's picture

DNA

Not finding DNA in the jelly I can understand but when one is trying to identify the stuff surely tests would have been done on the supposed black ova which I assume must contain DNA. Do we know if anyone has done this - critical - test?

Ian

D.M.H.'s picture

Sorry for all the links but

Sorry for all the links but if you scroll down to last picture on this page there is a Myxo that looks very similar. Clear jelly changing to black ball shape. I have tried to find what species from the list but its time consuming.

Www.facebook.com/Dorset.Mushroom.Hunters.

All given ID's are subject to error/ommissions. Please seek independent verification before acting on ANY advice given. BE SAFE =)

nightfly's picture

Hi Mark,I think that is

Hi Mark,

I think that is in fact black frog ova and entrail, dried out a bit but frog(toad or newt perhaps) ova and not mould.

A fresh version of the same thing, undried, is here:-

http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/312356?nav=latest

Edit- Mark sorry for linking this twice in responses to yourself. I hadnt seen this comment of yours pointing towards the pic at the bottom of the linked page when I made my former post with link! This ob. is getting more and more interesting all the time!! If a bit complex....

Cathal.

D.M.H.'s picture

Www.myxo.be

Www.myxo.be

Www.facebook.com/Dorset.Mushroom.Hunters.

All given ID's are subject to error/ommissions. Please seek independent verification before acting on ANY advice given. BE SAFE =)

chrisbrooks's picture

Debate

Hi Mark, a debate that will no doubt rumble on and on, I think. My only question is that this substance appears to be in standing water, would a slime mould form in such a place, I don't know the answer by the way. Chris.

nightfly's picture

Hi Mark, What is that black

Hi Mark,

What is that black stuff at the bottom of the linked page;

http://www.myxo.be/

The last photo? It isnt titled but it looks extremely like a dried version of discarded frog remains as in my observation here:

http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/312356?nav=latest

I just cant see what they are saying it is on that page, maybe you can help???? Cheers,

Cathal.

D.M.H.'s picture

I think this may be the

I think this may be the authors error at including as I have looked through every one on that list and it is not named at all.

Www.facebook.com/Dorset.Mushroom.Hunters.

All given ID's are subject to error/ommissions. Please seek independent verification before acting on ANY advice given. BE SAFE =)

D.M.H.'s picture

Could quite easily become

Could quite easily become inundated as not the fastest movers lol.

Www.facebook.com/Dorset.Mushroom.Hunters.

All given ID's are subject to error/ommissions. Please seek independent verification before acting on ANY advice given. BE SAFE =)

nightfly's picture

Hi,I hadnt heard about star

Hi,
I hadnt heard about star jelly before yesterday but I am familair with predated frog remains and the jelly and ova present along side pieces of frog and frog entrails look exactly like the picture above. Clearish acqueous matter and clumps of black beads stuck together which are exactly the same size and colour as frog ova. Finding it beside frog remains in frog habitat during the Spring would lead me to believe that it is unspawned frog spawn which has been exposed to the elements prematurely as a result of the animal being torn open by a predator rather than by the frog spawning it.

Edit- this is my best guess for the dismembered frogs I see at moorland lakes in the Spring and the associated lumps of jelly with black beads. Why the predator doesnt eat the frog intact I do not know. Herons seem to shoulder a lot of the blame, they are very obvious at the lakes in the Spring months but otters and foxes are present also.

Cathal.

Thistle's picture

... or "star snot"

Plenty of theories exist about this stuff. Have a look at http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/outdoors/articles/jelly/ if you have a spare hour or two!

As I've suggested above it really doesn't sound like rocket science for someone to have a proper look for DNA which might settle things one way or the other.

Ian

Jonathan's picture

Its been done and there was

Its been done and there was no DNA in it.

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

Thistle's picture

Confused!

So we're saying that we've got unfertilised ova with no DNA?? How can that be?

Jonathan's picture

Nope. Not ova. Its the jelly.

Nope. Not ova. Its the jelly. That is not cellular, but the product of cells. The comparison with snot is quite apposite.

See this http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/101544?nav=news_stories

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

Thistle's picture

Good photo, thanks.

That seems fairly conclusive and I'd not seen it before.

Ian

nightfly's picture

Another example of the black

Another example of the black ova in the picture above which explains where the jelly originates from can be seen here:

http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/312356

On this occasion the jelly wasn't present, but the commonly refused part of the frog which explains the occurance of the jelly is present.

Cathal.

Jonathan's picture

I have moved this to the

I have moved this to the Amphibian group for you.

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

lauracunningham's picture

This is fascinating! frogs,

This is fascinating! frogs, herons and foxes all present at the reserve so makes sense, thank you for everyones comments, ideas and discussions...

Roger Gilbert's picture

Connection between Star Jelly and Frog

The Jelly was spotted first and 60 yards away I found the Frog near one of our ponds either it was discarded or I disturbed a predator.

http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/314277?nav=users_observations

Howardian Local Nature Reserve
http://www.howardianlnr.org.uk