bryoman's picture

Flowering shrub.

Observed: 4th September 2012 By: bryoman
Flower
Flowering shrub
Description:

Planted shrub on old slag-heaps in reclamation area by sea.
Makes scattered vertical stems, the foliage silvery below, with a WAXY coating (photo); dark green above.
Sparse very small yellow flowers, with long corolla tube and four short corolla-lobes.
No idea what this is! - not a native, clearly.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

lavateraguy's picture

Apetalous?

I think that this is an apetalous plant, and what we are looking are is a calyx tube and calyx lobes.

Apetalous flowers with tetramerous symsepalous petaloid calyces is a marker for Thymelaeaceae, of which Daphne is the most commonly grown genus. (It looks to have 1 style and 4 stamens, which is also a match.)

But I don't recognise it as any commonly grown species of Daphne - it's not laureola or odorata or mezereum or bholua or cneorum. The flower reminds me of Edgeworthia chyrsantha, but that bears flowers in globular clusters.

bryoman's picture

Apetalous

Thanks for rapid response - yes - it may very well be as you say, calyx not corolla! (I don't think I was aware that the familiar Daphne was like this! - the flowers did remind me of Daphne, while the foliage clearly didn't.)

It was making scattered upright woody stems, perhaps from a creeping rhizome - but not making a branching shrub.

Thymelaeaceae - ludicrous number of vowels/?diphthongs... - looks a likely home for it.

Jeremy R.

Jeremy R.

lavateraguy's picture

Elaeagnus

Now I am reminded of the existence of the genus I agree. (I spent 2010 and 2011 agonising over the identity of Elaeagnus umbellata self-seeding on a Greenway.)

bryoman's picture

Elaeagnus

Oops - I'm busy typing up an answer to one thing while the actual answers are already being discussed back on the site!

Now I know where to look, I see that's right - it's mentioned in the Addenda of 'A Flora of Cumbria' p. 588 from there, as being planted in the 1970s.

I'm so familiar with the NAME Eleagnus, yet evidently so unfamiliar with the PLANT!!

I see from photos that this CAN create a shrub form, but I think I only noticed the +/- unbranched "vigorous suckers".

Thanks to both for help!

Oh - yeah - and now I see that Flora of Cumbria has it as Eleagnus - all those vowels again.

Jeremy R.

lavateraguy's picture

The more commonly planted ...

... Elaeagnus are members of the pungens/macrophylla/x submacrophylla group, which doesn't look particularly like this.

And, yes, it's much easier to identify stuff in hindsight when you know what it is.

It is a quite surprising degree of floral convergence (which I had overlooked) between Daphne and Elaeagnus. Referring to Stace, they even share unilocular uniovulate ovaries. But Daphne has 8 stamens, not 4 - checking more photographs again it turns out that Daphne has 8 stamens at 2 heights, and a lot of photographs only show 4. Another difference is that the ovule is basal in Elaeagnus and apical in Daphne.

lavateraguy's picture

Recording

You might like to let the Cumberland county recorder know that it's still present. The species hasn't been recorded there, or in anywhere else in Britain, this century.

bryoman's picture

Recording

Yes - I had been preparing a plant list for the site, and needed an ID for this one before submitting to the county recorder.

Thanks.

JR

Jeremy R.

bryoman's picture

"Jeremy R."

Oops - just noticed there's someone already posting as "jeremyr" - I'm 'new here' - but am Jeremy Roberts (Cumbria)...

Don't want to conflate the two JRs, so will need to sign more carefully, if I'm not just using my username...

I wonder if the other one is the Speyside bird warden, also Jeremy Roberts...

Jeremy R.

martinjohnbishop's picture

Another again

First Name
Jeremy
Last Name
Richardson
Location / Hometown
Tottenham
Field of Interest
British wildlife esp. Bats & Flies

History

Member for
1 year 2 weeks