Will Avery's picture

Ash keys

Observed: 11th November 2012 By: Will AveryWill Avery’s reputation in PlantsWill Avery’s reputation in PlantsWill Avery’s reputation in PlantsWill Avery’s reputation in Plants
Ash Keys
Description:
Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Ash (Fraxinus excelsior) interacts

Comments

Rachy Ramone's picture

Apparently a slightly-sought-after delicacy...

..one of my "old boys" says he pickles Ash keys for eating.

When asked what they taste like, he said "well, they taste ok - nothing special".

Makes you wonder why he bothers, doesn't it?!

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

martinjohnbishop's picture

Perhaps they need to be cured?

Rachy Ramone's picture

Which?

The keys - or the old boys??!

Fascinating link... can't quite believe that processing something in ultra-poisonous liquid that can be used for clearing drains is going to result in something fit for eating!

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

Will Avery's picture

He's not the only one

Googling "Pickled Ash Keys" confirms that he is not alone.

You can imagine environmental impact of commercial olive curing in Andalusia. Cocktail nibbles can come at a higher price than we imagine. The Wikipedia article on the Guadaira has a few details.

markwilson's picture

ash keys

Ash is unusual in that it retains its seeds on the plant - perhaps they do not contain toxins/distasteful chemicals that other plants use to protect their seeds