bradscottuk's picture

Mediterranean flower

Observed: 27th August 2010 By: bradscottukbradscottuk’s reputation in Plantsbradscottuk’s reputation in Plantsbradscottuk’s reputation in Plantsbradscottuk’s reputation in Plants
P8270112
Description:
Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Marsh-mallow (Althaea officinalis) interacts

Comments

lavateraguy's picture

ID

Another difference from Malva sylvestris (and section Malva in general) is that the inflorescence is pedunculate, whereas the Malvas have fasciculate inflorescences.

Rachy Ramone's picture

Translation for us lesser mortals:

inflorescence = "flower", that's pretty basic.

pedunculate = stalked.

fasciculate = "Many flowers arising from one point that grow in dense bunches"

*looks closely at original photo* Oh yes, I see what you mean, Stewart: the flowers in the photo above are actually on very short little stalks, ie pedunculate, and individually so.

Still learning....

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

lavateraguy's picture

jargon

Except that inflorescence is not "flower"; an inflorescence is a structured group of flowers, such as a spike, raceme, umbel, capitulum, etc. See also coflorescence (an auxillary inflorescence branched off the main inflorescence, as often seen in Digitalis purpurea) and capitulescence (a structured group of capitula, as in Solidago or Hieracium).

Pedunculate is better glossed as "possessing a peduncle", which is the common stem of a cluster of two or more flowers (or fruits); or as "stalked (of a cluster of flowers)". Stalked leaves are petiolate, and stalked individual flowers are pedicellate. (Old enough literature doesn't make the distinction between pedunculate and pedicellate.)

Fasciculate on the other hand is not specific to a specific organ - you can have fasciculate leaves or fasciculate hairs as well as fasciculate inflorescences.

Rachy Ramone's picture

Oh, you!

*slaps Stewart on back, in style of Dick Emery in drag*

Thank you, for giving me a headache this early in the morning! (and I am still recovering from a cold *angling for sympathy*)

Now that you mention it, I think I've encountered fasciculate hairs before.

I accept your corrections, and would plead the desire to make it simple......

So pedunculate oak is so-called because the acorns - the pedunculate part - are in bunches?

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

lavateraguy's picture

Pedunculate oak

The name pedunculate oak may be old enough to pre-date the distinction being made between pedunculate and pedicellate, so I can't say - without studywhether it meant stalked and bunched acorns, or just stalked acorns.

The name pedunculate oak appears to trace back to Salisbury's renaming of the species as Quercus pedunculata and Quercus sessiliflora (though he appears not to have been the first person to use Quercus pedunculata). The earliest use as a vernacular name, as found in Google Books, is in Loudon and Strutt's "The Derby Arboretum" of 1850.