Dodgydoug's picture

Hart's-tongue Fern

Observed: 20th November 2012 By: DodgydougDodgydoug’s reputation in PlantsDodgydoug’s reputation in PlantsDodgydoug’s reputation in Plants
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Description:
Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Hart's-tongue Fern (Phyllitis scolopendrium) interacts

Comments

MikeHolland's picture

would i right in saying that

would i right in saying that Phyllitis scolopendrium is the only fern with a single fron?????? leaf.???

lavateraguy's picture

No.

(Nowadays, the recognised name is Asplenium scolopendrium - DNA studies found Phyllitis and Ceterach to be nested in Asplenium.)

Asplenium scolopendrium does not have a single frond/leaf. I assume that you were trying to ask whether it was the only fern with a undivided frond/leaf.

It isn't. In Britain Polypodium vulgare agg. (3 species and 3 hybrids) and Blechnum spicant have undivided leaves. In this case they are pinnately lobed, in contrast to the strap-like leaves of Asplenium scolopendrium. The rarer Botrychium lunaria has undivided and unlobed leaves, as does the introduced Salvinia natans. Pilularia globulifera has rush-like leaves.

Among foreign ferns, the Asplenium nidus agg. has fronds quite similar to Asplenium scolopendrium, and Nephrolepis exaltans to Polypodium vulgare agg.

Rachy Ramone's picture

Phew...

...I thought it was Aspelenium scolopendrium, thank you for confirming that!

I'm assuming that Mike was asking if Hart's Tongue was the only fern with strap-like leaves (in the UK) and I had wondered the same, so thank you for the very complete answer.

You mentioned Botrychium lunaria (moonwort) - that is a weird-looking thing, isn't it?

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

lavateraguy's picture

Look at Isoetes lacustris (quillwort) -

weirdness is in the eye of the beholder, but I'd say that's even weirder looking.

There's also a "clover-leaved" fern to confound ones expectations.

Rachy Ramone's picture

Wow, Quillworts...

...they are cute tufty little things, aren't they?

But not as weird as the Botrychium lunaria. I shall be eagerly looking out for that one next year.

*laughs at clover-leaf aquatic ferns*

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

Stuie Heale's picture

Why is it called Harts - Tongue?

Why is it called Harts - Tongue?

S. Heale

lavateraguy's picture

Presumably ...

... someone thought the frond looked like the tongue of a deer (hart is an old word for stag). I don't suppose it's any more of a stretch than catsear, mouseear, coltsfoot, cocksfoot, dovesfoot, haresfoot, cattail, dogstail, foxtail, horsetail, marestail, etc.

steve_t's picture

According to the Oxford

According to the Oxford English Dictionary it's a translation from the medieval latin "lingua cervi", deer or Hart's tongue and refers to the long tongue shape of the leaf.