gareth b's picture

Large leaf (added via Android)

Observed: 19th November 2012 By: gareth bgareth b’s reputation in Plantsgareth b’s reputation in Plantsgareth b’s reputation in Plants
Photo 1
Photo 2
Photo 3
Description:

large leaf with double toothed edge

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Horse-chestnut (Aesculus) interacts

Comments

Rachy Ramone's picture

Darn!

I love leaf litter ID, one of my favourite pastimes at this time of year.

Can't offer a firm suggestion on this one, though - I really struggle to ID from photos, there's no sense of scale, and so many subtleties just don't show up in photos.

The small leaf looks like Hawthorn, the large one (presumably those are the toes of your boots?) could be Cockspur-thorn?

Any additional photos from the outing??

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

gareth b's picture

The small leaf is an oak leaf

The small leaf is an oak leaf which was about 4-5 cms long. Havent been able to identify the large leaf yet. Looked up cockspur-thorn and I don't think it's it, leaves look toosmall in the photos for it.

Thats all the photos of it im afraid.

Thanks for your help

Gareth

Rachy Ramone's picture

Oak? Oops.

Do you know, my first thought was oak for the little one, then I thought it was too small.

Unless you have monstrous feet...

I, too, thought that Cockspur-thorn was too small, but I looked it up and the tree book said 4" long.

There aren't many tree leaves with bases of that shape (cuneate) where the blade runs down into the petiole.

Good luck finding an answer!

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

Rachy Ramone's picture

Just a thought...

...while you were there, did you see any leafless stalks lying around?

It's possible that this is a de-laminated leaflet of, for example, horse chestnut.

(OK, de-laminated is not quite the right word, you know what I mean)

Usually, there is plenty of evidence of this lying around, but if you weren't looking for it, you might not have seen any.

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY