moongirl01's picture

Solitary wasp

Observed: 29th June 2009 By: moongirl01moongirl01’s reputation in Invertebratesmoongirl01’s reputation in Invertebratesmoongirl01’s reputation in Invertebratesmoongirl01’s reputation in Invertebrates
Misc6 023.jpg
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Description:

This solitary wasp emerged from a container where I'd been trying to rear a moth. I had no idea that it was there. Any ideas as to which species it is?

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

rimo's picture

This looks like a parasitic

This looks like a parasitic wasp to me - Ophion sp. or similar, in which case it's likely to be what's left of your moth!

Record your ladybird sightings!
www.harlequin-survey.org
www.ladybird-survey.org

moongirl01's picture

Yes, that's what I'd feared.

Yes, that's what I'd feared. The moth never emerged. The larva had been eating well and grew rapidly, then it disappeared into the soil (I thought it was going to pupate there) but as it was a species which overwinters as a pupa, I left it alone. However, the following summer, this wasp was all that emerged!

moongirl01's picture

Host

In response to gavb, I was trying to rear a Dot Moth (Melanchra persicariae).

Thanks for helping me with the identification of the parasitoid.

gavb's picture

Thank you for the host name!

Thank you for the host name! That's really useful, hopefully I can rear this ichneumonid again.

Gavin

Gavin Broad

Jonathan's picture

Nice find, Moongirl! Do you

Nice find, Moongirl! Do you happen to have a picture of the Dot Moth caterpillar? If you do, why not add it as an interaction to the observation of the parasitoid?

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

gavb's picture

paper on Enicospilus

Hi Moongirl! I'm just finishing a paper on British Enicospilus and was wondering if I could have your full name, to include in the list of people who have contributed reared specimens (or photos of wasps, in your case)? Yours is still the only host record for Enicospilus combustus.
All the best,
Gavin (g.broad@nhm.ac.uk)

Gavin Broad