Lucy Corrander's picture

Flat Periwinkle

Observed: 15th October 2012 By: Lucy CorranderLucy Corrander’s reputation in InvertebratesLucy Corrander’s reputation in InvertebratesLucy Corrander’s reputation in Invertebrates
                               Flat Periwinkle
Description:

Less than a centimeter. Bright yellow. Crawling around on wet rocks between pools where tide had just retreated.
(Except - if it is a flat periwinkle - why are flat periwinkles called 'flat' periwinkles when they aren't flat?)

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

nightfly's picture

Ive often wondered myself why

Ive often wondered myself why they are called flat, they only thing I can think it might be is that their cone could arguably be called flat as it isnt really there. If compared to a common, small or rough periwinkle, all of which have conical points, then this species is basically flat where the others have cones.

Cathal.

nightfly's picture

Having looked at these a wee

Having looked at these a wee bit more, I'm not sure its possible to bring it to species without seeing the aperture? Just a paper I read some time back about aperture shape and size. Chris?

Cathal.

ChrisMcA's picture

I guess you're right Cathal;

I guess you're right Cathal; & it's between obtusata or mariae, which seems to now be called L. fabalis; see http://www.seawater.no/fauna/mollusca/fabalis.html

nightfly's picture

Thats the 2 I was on about

Thats the 2 I was on about Chris, supposedly some examples are markedly different in aperture size, then theres the overlappers. The ones that are so close in aperture size they are hard to separate.

Someone shared me a link to a paper on them but Im not sure where it is now. Mariae is a great word.

Cathal.