geff.2007's picture

Butia odorata

Observed: 23rd September 2012 By: geff.2007
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Description:

Growing in the high street with many date palms but this was different. The fruit were very sticky, exuding clear liquid and there was a hint of pineapple about the sweet smell.
B.odorata has been confirmed on Tela-botanica, the French botanical website

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

geff.2007's picture

Thanks for the suggested i.d.

Thanks for the suggested i.d. Martin. I did look at this originally but came to the conclusion that the 'multiple' cupule is much larger and the fruit more pointed in my i.d when compared with P.canariensis? I think it must be an oil palm judging by the clear fluid oozing from the ripe fruits.

geff.2007's picture

Now there's a thought!!

Now there's a thought!!

Eskling's picture

A bit late ...

... but I think it might be this (Butia sp). Phoenix canariensis tends to form a very wide base and when the lower fronds are cut off they form a diamond shaped pattern. I did try to grow Butia capitata in my garden - it survived a few winters but succumbed to -11C!

martinjohnbishop's picture

May well be ...

having problems finding good descriptions.
The range of possibilities is described at http://www.france-palmier.com/index.html

Eskling's picture

24 species

That link is very useful. It lists 11 genera (24 species) most resistant to cold, of which only Phoenix, Jubaea and Butia have pinnate fronds (as does the palm in this observation). Jubaea has a massive trunk -its definitely not that. I've already indicated why I don't think it is Phoenix. Butia (3 species on list) looks quite likely.

Philip

PS I read that the Jelly Palm fruit is edible and has a pineapple-banana or apricot flavour. Seeds are 45% oil, also edible.

geff.2007's picture

Many months after the

Many months after the previous comments it has been suggested that this is Butia odorata which appears to be a more cold tolerant form of Butia capitata - http://www.palmweb.org/cdm_dataportal/taxon/b4bc055a-e494-497c-a48e-b843e1522545"
Sadly I haven't seen it since taking the photos in 2012 and don't know if it succumbed to a particularly hard winter or was just subject to the axe!