Rachy Ramone's picture

Flowering shrub for ID please

Observed: 17th June 2012 By: Rachy RamoneRachy Ramone is knowledgeable about PlantsRachy Ramone’s earned reputation in PlantsRachy Ramone’s earned reputation in PlantsRachy Ramone’s earned reputation in PlantsRachy Ramone’s earned reputation in Plants
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Description:

Large woody shrub, glossy dark green leaves like laurel but much more pointed at the tip, held alternately: in summer had long racemes of small white flowers.
I feel I ought to know it.... but can't put a name to it!

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Prunus interacts

Comments

Rachy Ramone's picture

Not laurocerasus...

David, definitely not P. laurocerasus, I am very, very familiar with that one: the flowers are quite different, and the leaf shape on this chappy is wrong, much too pointed at the tips.

P. lusitanica is a possibility, I didn't think it grew as large as this (tree sized) but having googled it, I was clearly mistaken.

I'll go back and see what it's done in the way of berries, that might help...

But thank you both for taking the time to contribute, much appreciated.

Rachy

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

David Trevan's picture

Prunus!

I agree the foliage is more like P. lusitanica except that that species has very distinctive red stems and petioles, not at all evident in this specimen but perhaps it is so vigorous that the red colour has yet to develop!A bit baffling
as their are not exactly a large number of evergreen Prunus species!Hilliers Manual of Trees and Shrubs does list 22 named cultivars of P.laurocerasus though, whereas their are only about 4 listed for P. lusitanica, In my own garden I grow P. lusitanica subsp, azorica which has particularly red stems and petioles.Be interesting if we have any more contributions to this observation!

David J Trevan

Rachy Ramone's picture

Ooh those red petioles....

Hi David,

Do you know, I very nearly added "and they don't have red petioles" to my response, but chickened out as I am not that familiar with lusitanica!! And thought I might be wrong.

Memo to self: must be more confident.

If you (or anyone reading) can specify a characteristic that would help with ID, I am perfectly happy to go back and have yet another look.

If all else fails I may knock on the owners' door.. but in my experience, owners rarely know all of their plants accurately!

Rachy

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

lavateraguy's picture

evergreen Prunus

I have the impression that there are indeed a large number of evergreen Prunus, but that they're mostly tropical. But I might be wrong in my belief that members of section Laurocerasus are consistently evergreen.

(Prunus 'Otto Luyken' is listed as a P. laurocerasus cultivar, but has rather different foliage, so we can't absolutely rely on the foliage to eliminate a Prunus laurocerasus cultivar.)

David Trevan's picture

Prunus!

I was obviously referring to the evergreen species and cultivars grown in the UK, not the genus worldwide!
P. laurocerasus 'Otto Luyken' does have very distinctive foliage and is quite a compact cultivar, often used as a kind of bushy ground cover.

David J Trevan