synan's picture

Anaptychia ciliaris

Observed: 22nd August 2012 By: synansynan is knowledgeable about Fungi and Lichenssynan’s earned reputation in Fungi and Lichenssynan’s earned reputation in Fungi and Lichenssynan’s earned reputation in Fungi and Lichenssynan’s earned reputation in Fungi and Lichenssynan’s earned reputation in Fungi and Lichens
Anaptychia ciliaris
Anaptychia ciliaris (2)
Anaptychia ciliaris (3)
Anaptychia ciliaris (4)
Anaptychia ciliaris (5)
Anaptychia ciliaris (6)
Anaptychia ciliaris (7)
Description:

On coastal rock. Strap-like lobes with marginal cilia; pruinose in places.
I have deliberately avoided specifying a subspecies (ciliaris or mamillata). The saxicolous, coastal habitat, narrow lobes (<2mm in my small sample) and dark cilia draw me strongly towards the rare A. ciliaris subsp. mamillata. However, a minute, thin tomentum is visible under a stereomicroscope, and some thalli have paler lobes and cillia. A population of intermediates perhaps?

Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

AlanS's picture

subspecies

Hi Nigel,

Interesting observation. This ought to be subsp. mamillatum, from habitat, geography and frequency of modern records in SE Scotland.

However, the tomentum can be seen in the photographs (highest resolution, just visible in profile) and your photos don't match the photograph of mamillatum in Ann Allen's "Lundy Lichens" (an excellent little booklet for coastal species).

I confess that I have never seen A. ciliaris, though I note it is in East Lothian, which I regularly visit, so I shall chase it up. Consequently I have no personal insight. However, identification just to species is clearly justified, and it does suggest that the subspecific separation is dubious.

Alan

synan's picture

I'm glad it deserves attention

I haven't seen the tree-loving nominate subspecies either, just to compound my uncertainty. I also spotted this in the Kilminning Nature Reserve near Crail, but it seemed more scarce there.

I don't think you'll struggle for long to find it on the basalts between Elie's lighthouse and Lady's Tower.

I will, of course, gladly send you my sample.

Nigel

synan's picture

Whelan

Quite by accident, I discovered subsp. mamillata in Whelan. His account is that this taxon is tomentose, contradicting Smith et al. I wonder if that's a mistake or his own observation.

Nigel

AlanS's picture

can't be bothered to think of a title

I see that the original description of 'Parmelia mammilata' was in 1847. Next time I'm in Edinburgh I'll see what it says, if I remember.

I suspect that there is a continual range of variation, maybe with formation of coastal ecotypes, and not two distinct taxa.

But there again, I'm writing about a lichen I have never seen, and, judging by my first post here, cannot even spell.

Alan

marlandza's picture

Love the pictures.

Love the pictures.

marland-uk
My favourite Lichen Site
MARINE, MARITIME AND OCEANIC LICHENS
'What is not shared is lost'
http://www.lichensmaritimes.org/index.php?lang=en