PC1's picture

_DSC8587

Observed: 24th August 2012 By: PC1
_DSC8587
Description:

Is this fruit edible?

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa) interacts

Comments

Amadan's picture

It looks like a Damson or Sloe

at first sight, but as with any wild food where there is a chance of confusion, best not to risk it on a photo alone.

ABK's picture

Is it edible

Sloes from Blackthorn are excellent for making Sloe Gin with, but to just eat one would turn your mouth to cotton as they are so sour.

Amadan's picture

ABK is right -

When I was a small child, a relative showed me what he called "winter-cracks", growing on thorny black stems in a hedge. Like the trusting fool I was, I tried one. Talk about sour!
However, I now know that if pricked with a pin, covered with sugar, then steeped for a month under an equal quantity of gin, you have a drink to be savoured.
You can even make an alcoholic, stony crumble with the residues.

PC1's picture

Very good :)

Very good :)

Fenwickfield's picture

Damson

I made some wine from them last year just finished fermenting after 11 months very nice but very strong one glass knocks you out so have had to add some water when drinking it.

Fenwickfield

Amadan's picture

It is, I think

one of the finest country wines. An old chief chemist I worked for used to make it with the wild yeast on the fruit. It came out very dry, and was a slow ferment, but the result was superb.