Chris Davenport's picture

Fungus

Observed: 14th August 2012 By: Chris Davenport
Fungus
Fungus - additional image
Description:

Red stem and red flesh is particularly noticeable.

Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

flaxton's picture

What tree was it under?

What tree was it under?

Chris Davenport's picture

Oak. About 20cm diameter.

Oak. About 20cm diameter.

flaxton's picture

B chrysenteron does not grow

B chrysenteron does not grow with oak so try Xerocomus cisalpinus

Fenwickfield's picture

maybe

I wonder if you better change it Mal as it's wrong,I also think this show's that it is very important for people to note the habitat that the fungi is in as many fungi are only associated with certain plants.

Sheila

Fenwickfield

flaxton's picture

Sheila I am not expert enough

Sheila
I am not expert enough to "know" but the latest works suggest Oak cisalpinus and chrysenteron under fagus or conifer. So without compelling reason I would change it.

Mal

miked's picture

Suspect rather a lot of B.

Suspect rather a lot of B. chrysenteron records need looking at as it was recorded as such a common species with x.(or b.) cisalpinus unheard of. Actually that whole group of relatively small "Bolete" like things with hints of red or yellow may need looking at again with these newer findings. Do you happen to have a reference on it?

Have found a little bit about this e.g. "The phylogeny of selected Phylloporus species,
inferred from NUC-LSU and ITS sequences,
and descriptions of new species from the Old World" (2012)
Maria Alice Neves & Manfred Binder & Roy Halling & David Hibbett & Kasem Soytong. This is not about Xercomus per se but does confirm that its not a natural group and there are other genera such as Phylloporus nested within it.
Have found several papers talking about Xercomus and some of the newly described species (such as Xerocomus silwoodensis) in the group but not spotted where it says there are strict host associations, have probably just missed it when skimming through the papers.

flaxton's picture

My main reference is British

My main reference is British Boletes by Geoffrey Kibby. The website boletales.com although it does not follow the new information available in BB it is still worth a visit.
Mal