Simon Walker's picture

Kingfisher, male

Observed: 19th July 2012 By: Simon WalkerSimon Walker’s reputation in BirdsSimon Walker’s reputation in BirdsSimon Walker’s reputation in BirdsSimon Walker’s reputation in BirdsSimon Walker’s reputation in Birds
Kingfisher, preening, Rye Meads, 2012-07-19 002 reduced
Kingfisher, preening, Rye Meads, 2012-07-19 003 reduced
Kingfisher, Rye Meads, 2012-07-19 010 reduced
Description:

The main reason I've included yet another kingfisher is that I took these shots at a distance where I wouldn't have expected to the results to be as good as this.
I had the camera on a tripod, with a cable release, and used the rear screen rather than through-the-lens, to avoid the vibration caused by the mirror moving. Everything I could think of to reduce vibration, in fact. The camera was a Canon 7d with a 500mm F4 lens with a 1.4 extender. I'll experiment further, I think.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Weekend Explorer's picture

great images, could be maybe

great images, could be maybe improved with the use of the polarising filter... if it is shoot in the strong light or middle of the day, still great image, I wish I had a chance of taking a photo of one myself.

Vl

Simon Walker's picture

You Can, If You Have a Camera...

Rye Meads, where this was taken, is as close to you as it is to me, I think; on the outskirts of Hoddesdon. It's a great place to visit, and not justt for birds; I've photographed dragonflies and mammals there too (there's a fox that shows up quite frequently). Google RSPB Rye Meads and you'll find the place. Good luck.

I've tried polarising filters, but I've always found that there's a trade off between the effect you get and a loss in image quality. I prefer to get the best definition I can, though I use a polarising filter for creatures under the water - fish, insects and so on. The gain on reflection suppression makes it worthwhile.