nc5339's picture

Arenaria interpres

Observed: 22nd April 2012 By: nc5339
S159 Neighbourhood Nature - course completeThanet Coast Project
nc5339’s reputation in Birds
22042012   Arenaria interpres (Turnstones-  with feeding companions)
Description:

Just at the end of spring, before the big fly-off, these Turnstones are feeding up.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

David Jardine's picture

Juveniles?

What criteria are you using to age these birds? Why are they juveniles?

all the best

David

David Jardine's picture

Juveniles?

What criteria are you using to age these birds? Why are they juveniles?

all the best

David

David Jardine's picture

Juveniles?

What criteria are you using to age these birds? Why are they juveniles?

all the best

David

David Jardine's picture

Juveniles?

What criteria are you using to age these birds? Why are they juveniles?

all the best

David

ophrys's picture

Juveniles

I'm not sure I could age the Turnstones from the photos, but there may be juveniles among them. I imagine that the paler birds with them are Knot, as they seem similar in size to the Turnstones. It is a bit difficult to see detail of plumage, though, so I am not sure. Did you see Knot with them?

Ian
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nc5339's picture

They were with adult

They were with adult Turnstones, they had fluffy feathers and were being herded around by the Turnstones. I did not see any Knot, (or Sanderlings which are more common here); but then I'm not an expert, just a regular walker on these shores.

ophrys's picture

Fluffy feathers

In April, juveniles would basically look the same as adults, though would have slightly paler edges to some of the feathers on their wing and back. They would not have any fluffy feathers at all.

I suspect that you were looking at the other species with the Turnstone and assuming they were juveniles. I think they are Knot, which might appear to have slightly fluffed-up feathers, at least in comparison to the Turnstones, partly just due to their paler colour. It is quite common for other species to accompany Turnstones, in order to profit from any invertebrates disturbed by the Turnstones' foraging.

Ian
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nc5339's picture

Knot the kids then

I went away and read up on Turnstones. Now I can see why y'all were so dismissive. They don't breed in England at all. Duh me ...
It is possible that the other paler birds were Knot, though I thought they were about the same size as Red Shanks. These were definitely smaller. Maybe Sanderlings after all. Next time I will bring my binoculars with me. My camera is just a Nokia N8, so not great for close ups...
Apologies for misplaced enthusiasm. Not very scientific ...

nc5339's picture

I've edited the title to

I've edited the title to reflect the birds that I am sure of.

ophrys's picture

Turnstones

Sorry if we seemed dismissive...didn't mean to! It's good to have posts like this, which make you look closely and think about what is around. Knot are a bit smaller than Redshank and have far shorter legs. I think that is what these are as, in the picture, they look around the same size as the Turnstone. Sanderling would look smaller.

Some nice areas down there for birding... used to visit regularly, as I grew up near the North Kent marshes.

Ian
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/52163027@N02/