Pam Burrow's picture

Cat's Ear

Observed: 17th July 2012 By: Pam Burrow
S159 Neighbourhood Nature - course complete
Pam Burrow’s reputation in PlantsPam Burrow’s reputation in PlantsPam Burrow’s reputation in PlantsPam Burrow’s reputation in PlantsPam Burrow’s reputation in Plants
Cat's Ear
Cat's Ear 2
Cat's Ear 3
Cat's Ear 4
Cat's Ear 5
Cat's Ear 6
Cat's Ear 7
Description:

Single flowers on slender stems. Leaves small, narrow, single,linear.
Have added more photos of side and under-flower head views for aids to id.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Cat's-ear (Hypochaeris radicata) interacts

Comments

moremoth's picture

Side view

A side view of the flowers of these dandelion-like flowers would be very useful, showing bracts and the undersides of the outer petals.

Bill Welch

lavateraguy's picture

Cichorioids

I don't have any trouble telling Scorzoneroides autumnalis (hawkbit) from Hypochaeris radicata (cat's ear) in the field - I'm more like to overlook a non-flowering specimen of the former as Taraxacum officinale agg. (dandelion) - but photographs are a different matter.

That aside, I'm leaning to Hypochaeris radicata, in which the leaves are coarsely hairy, and the uppermost portion of the flower stalk is hollow.

Bracts are useful aids to identification of cichoroid daisies.

Wildlife Ranger's picture

What can be Seen ??

The Basal rosette contains a number of stems
The stems appear solid and bear a small bract like structure the ??Cats Ear
The stem is smooth and non Hairy
The teeth and tip on the basal leaves are by and large rounded and not sharply ponted as in the Dandilion. Whilst not overly obvious one of the leaves shows signs of coarse hair
The rear view of the flower would be useful as pointed out above Pams later post of the rear of flower show the sepals etc making the Cat's Ear a likely ID
The tips of the petals have 5 teeth
There is structure to the central flower as opposed to a dandlion like rays

HTH

WLR

Whats Happening with Nature ??? Visit the Nature Blog

http://florafaunauk.blogspot.co.uk/

www.ukwildlife.net

Supporting FEET Conservation work & Biodiversity Recording

http://www.ebid.net/uk/stores/medic1/Natural-History

Pam Burrow's picture

Cat's Ear

I've added some more photos - luckily I had brought a sample of the flower home. Hope this helps.
Thanks for all your interesting and helpful comments.
Pam

moremoth's picture

Cat's-ear

As well as small bracts on the stems there are similar bracts on the calyx. They are asymmetrically positioned, and have a purplish tip and teeth along a central ridge. The undersides of the outer petals have a greyish line as though someone has run a paintbrush along them. Put together, those are signs of a Cat's-ear.

Bill Welch

lavateraguy's picture

new observation

I've put up an observation of undoubted Hypochaeris radicata from my front lawn.

More notes:
* Both Hypochaeris radicata and Scorzoneroides autumnalis produce multiple flowering stems from a rosette.
* Both have leafless stems with small scales.
* Having ligulate flowers with five teeth (each tooth is the tip of a fused petal) is normal for cichorioid daisies.

The key character distinguishing them in Stace is the presence of receptacular scales among the flowers in Hypochaeris radicata, but I can't seem them in my photographs, so I guess that you have to dissect the capitulum to find them.

Poland writes that the latex of Scorzoneroides is bluish (occasionally yellow-white), while that of Hypochaeris is white, turning brown on exposure to air.

Wildlife Ranger's picture

Cat's Ear

Thanks Guys

The rear of the flower confirms it for me Pam and lavateraguy's new post of flower sequence helps document this plant

Best Wishes

WLR

Whats Happening with Nature ??? Visit the Nature Blog

http://florafaunauk.blogspot.co.uk/

www.ukwildlife.net

Supporting FEET Conservation work & Biodiversity Recording

http://www.ebid.net/uk/stores/medic1/Natural-History

moremoth's picture

Scales

If you pull a Cat's-ear flower apart you can find the scales with the naked eye; both long yellow ones, like skinny petals but not part of any floret, and short colourless toothed ones as illustrated in Rose.

Bill Welch

Pam Burrow's picture

Cat's Ear

Thanks so much for all your help, everyone. I've found your comments really interesting. Much appreciated.
Pam