Nick Upton's picture

Squid eggs sacs

Observed: 8th July 2012 By: Nick UptonNick Upton’s reputation in InvertebratesNick Upton’s reputation in InvertebratesNick Upton’s reputation in InvertebratesNick Upton’s reputation in Invertebrates
Squid eggs sacs (Loligo sp.), with developing embryos visible, in rockpool after being washed ashore, St.Bees, Cumbria, UK, July.
Description:

Several clusters of these sausage shaped and sized jellified masses attached to green seaweeds, were washed up on a Cumbrian shore and into rockpools. I think they have to be squid egg cases (originally attached to subtidal vegetation) and in my original pics I can just see the outline of developing young squid with eyes, chromatophores and tentacles visible. I think Loligo is the most likely genus, but doubt it is possible to be sure of more than "squid species"?

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

ChrisMcA's picture

but Alloteuthis most likely

eg Alloteuthis subulata eggs, http://www.marlin.ac.uk/speciesinformation.php?speciesID=2461 ,whereas most eggs on net & Ispot are long & white, as in Loligo vulgaris eggs, http://www.marlin.ac.uk/speciesinformation.php?speciesID=3718 these are the only2 sp's on net with any egg info or photos it seems, though mln shows 2 loligo sp's & 2 subulata + Illex coindetii
+ the lesser flying squid (also in marlin). But howcome's this one confined to Lwr Sublit'l & U'r Bathyal, not ascending to the surface (accdg to species.org & Wikipedia)

Nick Upton's picture

Alloteuthis subulata

Many thanks for your input on this Chris. I agree they do look like the images of eggs on marlin for this species which I hadn't come across before and Loligo eggs do seem to be more opaque, longer and slimmer. I don't quite understand your query re the squid that's confined to lower sublittoral and upper bathyal. Which species and why does that seem odd?

Nick Upton, naturalist and photographer.

ChrisMcA's picture

odd squid

It's latin name Todaropsis eblanae,all uk coasts, & species.org give the habitat quoted, (so I couldn't imagine it able to fly),but it seems it belongs to a large family many of which do fly (ie glide) so maybe could have the innate ability (or just the name)

Nick Upton's picture

flying squid

Ok got it... Yes maybe close relatives fly and this one doesn't. Or maybe they do it at night.... and no-one has seen it. I read a New Scientist article recently about how it was discovered unexpectedly that Humboldt squid (which can be huge) fly at night and this can now explain how they migrate huge distances so fast and save a lot of energy by gliding rather than swimming. This link is to a short version of the story. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/2012/02/21/flying-squid-save-e...

Nick Upton, naturalist and photographer.

ChrisMcA's picture

Ah Humbodlt

V. interesting. I'd noticed Humboldt in the family, but in flight's almost unimaginable!