bobthebirder's picture

Spotty docks

Observed: 2nd June 2012 By: bobthebirderbobthebirder’s reputation in Fungi and Lichensbobthebirder’s reputation in Fungi and Lichensbobthebirder’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
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Description:
Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

Species with which Dock rust (Puccinia phragmitis) interacts

Comments

orchid_b's picture

Ramularia

But would also be good to have some pics of the two Ramularia spp, which are described in the New Nat Plant Diseases as having purple-edged spots on top, and white conidia underneath. The b/w pic in the book does look quite like the colour pics above. I think you may have to check the white spores under a microscope - stalked conidia or chains of telospores?

Jamie from Briantspuddle

AlanS's picture

Ramularia

The Ramularia species on docks cause considerably darker purple spots and the tufted conidiophores on the underside are scarcely visible to the naked eye and need a x15 or more lens to be seen clearly. Then they are like a tiny forest of little shrubs. Their appearance is short-lived, and while the spots on dock leaves are obvious enough, finding a spot with conidiophores takes a while longer and they may not be present on every leaf. The very common species on almost every large plant of Rumex obtusifolius is R. rubella, but two other species occur on this host and do need microscopic examination and measurement of the conidia.

By contrast, as we see in the photos above, the aecidia of Puccinia phragmitis are easily visible to the naked eye. The fungi are really not very alike.

Incidentally, the alternate host of P. phragmitis is, as the name suggests, Common Reed, Phragmites australis. The rust on comfrey species alluded to in the IDs above is quite a different species, Melampsorella symphyti, which does not form aecia (cluster cups) and is usually seen as its yellow, powdery, uredinial state.

Alan

orchid_b's picture

Ramularia

But would also be good to have some pics of the two Ramularia spp, which are described in the New Nat Plant Diseases as having purple-edged spots on top, and white conidia underneath. The b/w pic in the book does look quite like the colour pics above. I think you may have to check the white spores under a microscope - stalked conidia or chains of telospores?

Jamie from Briantspuddle