jhn7's picture

Ramalina farinacea ? No Evernia prunastri

Observed: 23rd April 2012 By: jhn7
S159 Neighbourhood Nature - course complete
jhn7’s reputation in Fungi and Lichensjhn7’s reputation in Fungi and Lichensjhn7’s reputation in Fungi and Lichensjhn7’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
P1210911-001
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P1210913-001
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Description:

The last photo shows the 'garden' of lichen growing on this twiggy branch of a veteran oak. I thought at first Evernia prunastri but I think this is a nutrient rich bark.

Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

synan's picture

Argh

I must have looked at this half a dozen times. There are no obvious net-like ridges, but the neat, dichotomous branching in places looks like that of E. prunastri. I can't see any obvious soralia that might clinch it. One for Alan or Jenny methinks.

Nigel

jhn7's picture

Thanks for this.

I've been going round in circles so in a way I am glad it is not that obvious! I've put off looking at the others until I've solved this one but I did think it was a lovely group.

Janet
Certificate in Contemporary Science (Open)

synan's picture

It is

It is. The others are Xanthoria parietina (the yellow iSpot favourite), Physcia tenella (with the lip-shaped powdery tips) and Parmelia sulcata (the leaf-like one). I'm not sure about the greenish one at the bottom left - possibly Melanelixia subaurifera.

Nigel

jhn7's picture

What a star!

Thank you so much! I'd got the Xanthoria parietina - one of my favourites and my first iSpot entry http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/76872?nav=users_observations helped by Jenny.
I think you are correct with
http://www.irishlichens.ie/pages-lichen/l-155.html

Janet
Certificate in Contemporary Science (Open)