sophie bagshaw's picture

DSC08493

Observed: 1st April 2012 By: sophie bagshawsophie bagshaw’s reputation in Mammals
DSC08493
DSC08463
Description:

nest of 8. found in a hole on the beach filled with nesting material.IE, straw, hay, grass, feathers...
eyes stilled closed so approximately 7 days old.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Fenwickfield's picture

back

I hope there aright as they will still be needing there parents for milk and the mother may now be put off as they will have human smell on them.I have hand reared wild rabbits were the adults have been killed and these are approx 7 days old.

Fenwickfield

sophie bagshaw's picture

rabbits

the mother came back and dug the hole again but sadly the tide came in and drowned them all. i went back to see if any had survived but unfortunately they didnt :(

Sam Griffin's picture

In my experience with captive

In my experience with captive rabbits, even minor disturbance from humans - not handling - will result in the mother either abandoning the nest or killing the young herself. Dependant juveniles should never be handled like this. In this instance it would appear the mother planned the nest burrow badly anyway (given it was later flooded), but I would never advise picking up young mammals.

sophie bagshaw's picture

advice

i will consider your advice next time i find some young animals, but what if they are trapped should i leave them or rescue them.

Sam Griffin's picture

You need to weigh up what you

You need to weigh up what you will do with them once rescued. A parent will very rarely take them back if they are moved, so it is likely you would need to hand rear them. This can be difficult - requiring constant attention, often through the night for young animals, specialist diet and feeding, attention to defication requirements etc etc. You may then find that they become imprinted on humans and must therefore be kept in captivity for the rest of their lives. Even supposing it was possible to save them, hand rear them, avoid imprinting and release them back to the wild, you must ask the question - are you perpetuating a genetic line which is fundimentally unable to select an appropriate breeding site? I'm not saying never save doomed babies - I've done it with varying degrees of success (from completely successful to complete disaster!). Suffice to say there are a lot of things to consider before picking up a baby animal. "Nature is red in tooth and claw" and personally I think I might be tempted to leave rabbits.. Maybe you could take some consolation in the fact that the mother will learn a valuable lesson and something else will get an easy meal. Or maybe I'm a bit heartless! :)

Fenwickfield's picture

Good advice

Sam has given good advice and it is no picnic hand rearing and some do become imprinted. I too have had disaster and success but it is a major commitment as I have spent sleepless nights feeding every two hours being bitten scratched ect and ending up with a creature that does not truly have the life it should because of human intervention,we do it as we think were doing the right thing but the right thing for who (ourselves)I have ended up with a goose called George who followed me everywhere a sheep who thought it was human( it ran away from other sheep) and rabbit's,fawn that could not be re introduced to the wild,most of these were from the R.S.C.A as I was a foster parent for wild animals.I learnt my lesson leave well alone,try not to think about it and hope for the best only intervene if it's in obvious distress then take it to the vet's (no cost for wildlife) I have done this with a Hedgehog and a Tawny owl with a broken wing.

Fenwickfield

sophie bagshaw's picture

advice

all of that is good advice but im still only a kid and i didnt really think of some consequences but i will know for next time and will pass on the advice. :)

Fenwickfield's picture

Don't worry

Were not hear to have a go at you it is more help and education from experience of making mistakes when I was young and I do understand as I have done the same when I was a kid but now know the consequence's and it is nice to know we have a new generation taking an interest in nature.

Best wishes and look forward to future observation of wildlife.

Fenwickfield

sophie bagshaw's picture

im not worried and i know

im not worried and i know your not here to have a go at me i was just asking for some friendly advice and what to do and what not to do with encountering problems like this. and yes i love nature and wildlife too bad there arent more people who are like me. i am trying to get my friends involved with more insects and the environment but they just think its a waste of time, but me and another friend LOVE nature and find everything facinating.
thanks and i will :)

Gill Sinclair's picture

Keep up the good work

I'm hugely heartened to hear about your enthusiasm for nature Sophie, and keep trying to encourage your friends to get involved. It's also a great way to meet like-minded people - I have done volunteering on wildlife conservation projects in the UK and overseas and years later am still in touch with people I have met even if only by email.

I am another person who has learned by my mistakes with 'rescuing' wildlife 20+ years ago, having mistaken some leverets left in a form by their mother for abandoned baby rabbits, and landed myself with the two-hourly feeding regime when they would have been just fine, so it is good that we can all share our experiences and learn lessons from each other.

Gill Sinclair
OU Certificate in Contemporary Science
www.gillsinclair.net
Twitter @Gill_Sinclair

sophie bagshaw's picture

thanks

thankyou Gill and i will try to encourage them to get involved with more wildlife.