Nick Upton's picture

Sicus ferrugineus

Observed: 21st April 2012 By: Nick UptonNick Upton’s reputation in InvertebratesNick Upton’s reputation in InvertebratesNick Upton’s reputation in InvertebratesNick Upton’s reputation in Invertebrates
Sicus ferrugineus
Description:

8mm ruddy coloured bristly fly with abdomen curled under. A distinctive parasite of bumblebees which injects its eggs into the bees' abdomens..

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Syrphus's picture

You would be very unlikely to

You would be very unlikely to see Sicus before mid-May, and usually much later than that. Myopa (or at least some species thereof) are early fliers.

M.

TRY

recording wildlife with The Recorder's Year on www.hbrg.org.uk/TRY.html.

Nick Upton's picture

Myopa

Many thanks Roger and Syrphus. Myopa is a new conopid genus to me and now I look closer I see the frons is not yellow and the legs less uniform in colour than in Sicus. I'll look out for them again..

Nick Upton, naturalist and photographer.

ophrys's picture

Myopa

Fantastic flies, but devilishly hard to track down and also devishly hard to identify to species from a photo. I manage to find M. vicaria on Sallow occasionally, but other species are elusive. I've heard talk (I think it was Steven Falk saying it) of Rape crops being worth a look, if there are plentiful bees using the flowers. Should the rain ever stop, I intend to give that a try.

Ian
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Nick Upton's picture

Conopids

Yes, weird looking things and a fiendish lifestyle. I see a few Conopids in my garden every year, usually just sunning on leaves like this one was, but haven't found a consistent place to search for them - and have not seen it again today. I see a lot more in Mediterranean climes when I get the chance to go, but find them hard to get closer to.

Nick Upton, naturalist and photographer.

Syrphus's picture

Maybe it is coincidence, but

Maybe it is coincidence, but I usually see M. buccata(the only one to get this far N) on Vaccinium myrtillus in open forest, sunning themselves.

M.

TRY

recording wildlife with The Recorder's Year on www.hbrg.org.uk/TRY.html.