Fenwickfield's picture

Pied Wagtail

Observed: 18th April 2012 By: FenwickfieldFenwickfield’s reputation in BirdsFenwickfield’s reputation in BirdsFenwickfield’s reputation in BirdsFenwickfield’s reputation in Birds
Pied wag
Pied wag (2)
wagtails 002
wagtails 003
wagtails 004
Description:

living and nesting in the garden they arrive in March ans stay till late autumn but never stay the winter.I have added three more photo's of both birds together which hopefully will help to confirm if they are both the same or one M alba and one M alba subsp. yarrellii they are nesting in the barns in my garden

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

ophrys's picture

yarrellii

I would agree with the first one as yarrellii, but the second bird is quite pale and the flanks are not very dusky...it could be a White Wagtail. Perhaps just Motacilla alba might be better.

Ian
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Fenwickfield's picture

pair

they are the only two in my garden and are a pair,would the two types breed as a pair,as I am not that knowledgeable on them.I will change the id to your id.

Fenwickfield

ophrys's picture

Pair

If they are a breeding pair, then you are probably correct in your initial ID. However, mixed pairs do nest in Scotland each year, apparently, so it is possible that you have a yarrelli and an alba. The angle is not great on the female, though, and I suspect it looks paler than it really is.

Ian
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Bill Henderson's picture

Species

I'm never afraid to display my ignorance and so here goes again.

In classification, when you get down to the level of species then individuals have the potential to breed and produce viable young. If this is the case then there should be few, if any, barriers to different sub-species breeding.

Of course, I could be wrong.

Bill

Bill Henderson

bobthebirder's picture

wagtails

In this case the only barrier is the English Channel. Where alba and yarrelli meet, they do interbreed. I didn't know they got up to Scotland though.

I've just checked their distribution and alba is apparently the dominant subspecies in Shetland, Orkney, Iceland and Scandinavia.

Bob Ford

ophrys's picture

yarrellii

I think that the extra picture, showing the female from the side, shows it to be a female yarrellii. It looks rather darker grey and the duskiness on the flanks looks more than expected in alba. Shows the benefit of taking pics from different angles!

Ian
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